Oh my word

Oh my word

Watch how much choc you eat, you might get die of beaties

August 19 2019

Like many people, I am interested in current affairs. I always need to know the latest news. I enjoy opinions. To give me my daily “fix” I peruse news websites, take part in online discussions and read social media posts. This keeps me informed . . . and profoundly depresses me.

Oh my word

OH MY WORD: Do you know anyone who is an Alec?

August 5 2019

A few weeks ago, we discussed idiolects, the words and phrases you habitually use, and the favourite crutch-phrases and words that hold up the speech of those around us. You also have a familect. Or, more precisely, you take part in not just one familect but several.

Oh my word

I’ll have to have a word about Oor Wullie’s language

July 29 2019

You’ll have seen Oor Wullie’s Big Bucket Trail, I hope? The art installations have brightened streets across Scotland. It’s a wonderful idea and helps very good causes. But I might have a word with Wullie, the wee scamp, about his language. His “Jings, crivvens, help ma boab” is a strangled oath, sometimes called a minced oath.

Oh my word

What on earth is a nat-gih?

July 14 2019

A few weeks ago I became involved in the modern phenomena of podcasting. The podcast isn't about language, however, it discusses household tips. Nowadays the young would call them “life hacks”, but I refuse to countenance such a silly neologism.

Oh my word

Whatever became of Wallet Bayonet?

June 30 2019

The Oxford English Dictionary has released a list of new words included on its pages. They do this every three months, and the rate at which words are added is dizzying. This quarter’s tally is 1,400.

Oh my word

And you thought World War Z was a zombie movie . . .

June 17 2019

There is a war of words raging across the globe. The opposing forces are, on one side, the entire North American continent, and a battalion of etymology experts at the Oxford University Press (with support from The Oxford English Dictionary). And on the other side . . . me.

Breaking