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Why a Fife fisherman, an artist and musician King Creosote came together for unique Dundee shopping centre exhibition

Fife artists Kenny Anderson (King Creosote) and Keny Drew created the KY-10 exhibition.
Fife artists Kenny Anderson (King Creosote) and Keny Drew created the KY-10 exhibition.

Fife musician King Creosote and stained glass artist Keny Drew hope to draw crowds into Dundee’s Keiller Centre with their exhibition KY-10.

The Crail duo has waited two years to showcase their art installation which includes music, stained glass and lights.

Due to the pandemic, KY-10 is shown for the first time at The Federation set up by Kathryn Rattray Gallery in the Keiller Centre.

The exhibition tells the story of a floating buoy starting its journey in Crail before being dragged by the currents around the world.

East Neuk inspiration

Keny Drew at East Neuk Glass found his inspiration for the story at Crail harbour.

While listening to music, he created a tale of a buoy and his seagull sidekick watching what happens in the sea.

East Neuk glass artist Keny Drew.
East Neuk glass artist Keny Drew.

His friend and Fife artist Kenny Anderson – also known as King Creosote – came onboard to create KY-10.

Mr Drew says: “I wrote the story for the album, Kenny wrote all the music that goes with it and did some of the artwork with me.

“Then there’s Ronnie Hughes, a fisherman from Anstruther, he is the narrator of the story.

“He has no experience in this sort of thing, we just set him up with a microphone and off he went.

Fife musician Kenny Anderson (King Creosote) who wrote the music for the KY-10 exhibition.
Fife musician Kenny Anderson wrote the music for the KY-10 exhibition.

“On the album you can hear him tripping over his words, but we left it unedited so it feels like he’s talking to you.”

Attracting Keiller Centre visitors

The majority of the art pieces are stained glass and lights, but there are also prints on the walls.

Each piece has a set of headphones playing stories so visitors can sit and listen while looking at the art.

Through the music and pictures, the buoy travels across the seas.

The buoy's story is illustrated through stained glass.
The buoy’s story is illustrated through stained glass.

“He’s got no control, and on his travels he encounters people and different stories,” says the artist.

“It’s mainly about the beautiful things that happen in the ocean, like blooms of jellyfish, but also the horrible things like pollution and piracy.”

KY-10 is on in the Keiller Centre Tuesday to Thursday from noon to 4pm and Friday to Saturday from 10am to 5pm in April.

Every Saturday at 1pm, parts of the musical story will be played live.

Mr Anderson says: “We’d like to see people come in, spend some time and drift away.”

Gallery owner Kathryn Rattray is on a mission to “make the Keiller Centre great again“.

Artists Kenny Anderson (King Creosote) and Keny Drew with gallery owner Kathryn Rattray.
Artists Kenny Anderson and Keny Drew with gallery owner Kathryn Rattray.

The Crail duo hopes the live shows will get more people to visit the art installation.

“This exhibition shouldn’t be in a big fancy gallery, it’s not for that. It should be something you stumble upon.

“People should come in, hear some of the stories, see we’re playing live and then come back.

“Hopefully by the end it’s much busier and then it just pops and it’s gone.”

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