Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Bid to have extra 100,000 tonnes of barley malted on Scottish soil

The investment will support moves to produce whisky which is “sown, grown and malted” in Scotland.
The investment will support moves to produce whisky which is “sown, grown and malted” in Scotland.

A £50 million investment in new facilities in Arbroath and Inverness will allow an additional 100,000 tonnes of Scottish barley to be malted by 2022.

The focus of the move, being taken by Bairds Malt and procurement arm Scotgrain, will be supplying the whisky trade with a product which is “sown, grown and malted” in Scotland – providing a unique provenance to back up the image used by distillers.

At a Scottish malting conference, Keith Headridge, commercial director of Scotgrain, said while there was every sign the recent expansion in the whisky trade was set to continue, there had been little in the way of spending in the malting infrastructure required to service this in recent years, other than the company’s £25m investment in Arbroath in 2010.

The company – which is part of the global GrainCorp Malt Group – currently handles more than 200,000 tonnes of malt in Scotland for the distilling trade. However, despite the fact the majority of the 900,000 tonnes of barley used by the trade is grown in Scotland, companies often take a large portion of this south of the border for malting.
Mr Headridge said the move would do more than provide provenance for whisky makers.

“Not only will we be supplying a quality product to the distillers but with state-of-the-art processing facilities and local sourcing, the investment will mark a huge step forward as far as road miles and carbon footprint are concerned – adding considerably to the sustainability of the product,” he said.

He said volume contracts had already been agreed with distillers but added there had also been a step change in how whisky was marketed.

He added: “The Scottish brand is highly important to the industry – and more and more the industry is looking to ‘premiumisation’ of their products.”

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]