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Blether: World Cup stars started out around Lochee

Blether: World Cup stars started out around Lochee

Andy Walker continues his crusade on what Lochee did for the sporting world.

His latest offering concerns football’s World Cup.

“In the 1982 World Cup in Spain, two lads from Lochee played against one another,” said Andy.

“The duo had been S-Form signings for the same team, Dundee United, and both were team-mates at Tannadice.

“David Narey, who was from Charleston, went on to have a marvellous career for United.

“The other laddie had to go to the other side of the world. Alan Boath, from Menzieshill, emigrated to New Zealand, where he made his name in football.

“His adopted country honoured Alan by selecting him to represent The Kiwis in Spain for the World Cup.

“The match itself saw Scotland cruise to a 5-2 victory.

“In the 86th minute of the game, a substitution was made, Narey for Gordon Strachan.

“This meant two former team-mates playing in the game from opposite sides of the world were meeting on a field in Spain.

“And, yes, they had their grounding on the streets of Lochee.”

ANOTHER tale from Andy — not connected with Lochee — has him reckoning the joke about the referee telling a foreign player to behave and did not book him because of the spelling is absolutely true.

He said: “In a Texaco Cup tie in the 1970s, a Ballymena player was called over to the referee, where he was to be booked.

“His name was Thomas Gowdy.

“Three times he was asked his name and three times the match official got it wrong.

“Gowdy eventually asked the referee to hand over his book, which he did, and Gowdy proceeded to write his name.

“The referee in question was a Scotsman — Eddie Pringle, from Edinburgh.”

n ROB Boag’s story about Celtic Lisbon Lions stars Tommy Gemmell and Billy McNeill with the club doctor brought this response from Andy.

“I reckon you missed out the best part of the story,” said Andy.

“The doctor and Billy McNeill between them had about £3 in local currency.

“Tommy had a large note, about £20 in local money, so, when the collection tray came around, the biggest donator was Tommy.

“Over the years, when Tommy was telling this story, the amount he put in went up with inflation!”

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This article originally appeared on the Evening Telegraph website. For more information, read about our new combined website.