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Blether with Brown: Club chosen only because the fee paid was £5 provie cheque

Blether with Brown: Club chosen only because the fee paid was £5 provie cheque

The ‘Unknown’ person featured playing dominoes in our June 14 edition has been identified.

Regular readers will recall it was a tale from Rob Boag regarding Frankie Davie’s pub in Lochee, which he offered as ‘the first real sports bar in Dundee’.

John McNaughton got in touch, saying: “The unknown gent sitting with George Gallacher, Peem McCoul and Henry McFadyen is my father Bert McNaughton.”

John then offered more information on his dad.

“He was born in 1916 in Lochee at 1 Flights Lane.

“He attended St Mary’s Lochee school until age 14 and went to work in the Post Office as a telegram boy and postman until he was called up and served in the Royal Navy.

“He played for both Lochee Harp and Dundee Violet before and after the war.

My dad was a regular in Frankie Davie’s bar and played junior football for both Lochee Harp and the Violet in the 1940s.

“He used to get slagged off by both sets of supporters but always in a friendly manner.

“He favoured Harp slightly and only signed for the Violet because the signing-on fee was a £5 provie (provident) cheque.

“That was a great deal back then.

“After the war, he rejoined the Post Office and worked there until he retired in 1961 through ill health.

“He worked part-time in Binnie’s Bar in Lochee and also socialised in the Logie Club and also Frankie Davie’s pub.”

John remembers these times, too, and he continued: “Your story on Davie’s pub stirred memories of when I used to go in there to see him.

“He was usually playing dominoes and I would sit and listen to the older regulars talk about the good old days when junior football was very well attended.

“They also spoke of many of the characters who my dad played against, along with some of his own team-mates.

“There was always lots of good banter flying around.

“I also had a few pints of their delicous heavy beer — the best pint of heavy in Lochee.

“Happy memories, indeed, of the good old days.”

I asked John for some information on himself, and he said: “I also worked in the Post Office as a telegram boy and postman.

“I played for Douglas Amateurs from 1964-66 before I received a bad injury, suffering a broken leg playing at Alyth.

“I played with some good players like Brian Alderson, John Wilkie and Mike Boyle with Douglas Amateurs.

“I was only 22 and really disappointed at having to stop playing.

“I am now retired after working in BT until 2004.

“My main interest in football now is going to watch my grandsons Greig (18), who is with St Mirren, and Ross (13), who plays for Dryburgh Boys Club U/15.

The photo of the domino-playing pub regulars also attracted comment on the various social media sides on the worldwide web.

Alexander Dunn said: “Just look at that pint of heavy (or 80 Shilling). Lots of pints with Bert — the best Postie in Tealing!”

Scott Laing commented: “I remember this photo when it was in the museum.”

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This article originally appeared on the Evening Telegraph website. For more information, read about our new combined website.