Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Stunning images of Jamaica captured by historic Dundee postcard firm go on display alongside modern collection

Stephen McLaren, Jamaica: A Sweet Forgetting - View through the Blue Mountains, Jamaica (left) and Varun Baker, Journey 1 - Joshua (centre) and friend on a central Kingston street, Jamaica
Stephen McLaren, Jamaica: A Sweet Forgetting - View through the Blue Mountains, Jamaica (left) and Varun Baker, Journey 1 - Joshua (centre) and friend on a central Kingston street, Jamaica

Eye-catching images of Jamaica captured by a renowned former Dundee postcard company are to be displayed at a new exhibition.

Moving Jamaica: Scottish-Caribbean Connections and Local-Global Journeys features stunning photographs dating back to the 1800s, including scenes recorded by historic city firm Valentine & Sons.

The business was founded in Dundee by James Valentine and grew to become Scotland’s leading manufacturer of picture postcards before being sold to Waddingtons in 1963 and then Hallmark in 1980.

The folding department of the old Valentine & Sons factory in 1964

Dundee operations ceased in 1994 but the firm is remembered for its wide-ranging collection and global reach, at one time holding offices in Jamaica, Medeira, Norway, Tangier, Canada, and New York.

Moving Jamaica, which opens at Dundee University at the weekend as part of its Festival of the Future, contrasts photographs taken in the 19th century by Valentine & Sons with those of contemporary photographers, Varun Baker and Stephen McLaren.

Dr Susan Mains, a lecturer in geography at Dundee University and curator of the exhibition, said: “Valentine & Sons was one of the world’s largest photographic companies and sent photographers around the world to create images for postcards.

“It’s fascinating to contrast their views of Jamaica with those of today.

“While Valentine & Sons images have played an important role in promoting tourist destinations, they contrast sharply with the photos of Scottish photographer Stephen McLaren, whose series Jamaica – A Sweet Forgetting unearths the often hidden but interwoven legacies of slavery in Jamaica and Scotland.”

The dispatch department of the old Valentine & Sons factory in the lead up to Christmas 1956

Also accompanying the historic images of Valentine & Sons are those of Jamaican photographer Varun Baker, who explores the relationship between multiculturalism and mobility in modern-day Jamaica.

Baker’s latest series, Journey, provides a personal tour through the current urban island landscapes of the country.

Alongside the photography collection, research materials from the international Caribbean In/Securities: Creativity and Negotiation in the Caribbean (CARISCC) project will also be on display.

CARISCC is an interdisciplinary research network of seven leading universities in Caribbean Studies, including the universities of Dundee, Leeds, Glasgow, Amsterdam, Brock University in Canada, Rutgers University in the USA, and the University of the West Indies (Mona) in Jamaica.

The exhibition has been created in partnership with Dundee University’s Museum Services, the Photographic Collections at St Andrews University Library Special Collections and the CARISCC Network, with additional support provided by the Leverhulme Trust.

Moving Jamaica: Scottish-Caribbean Connections and Local-Global Journeys opens on Saturday and will run until January 19.

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]