Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Important deity recalling Ancient Egypt leads sale of exceptional treasures in Montrose

Post Thumbnail

An Egyptian brown quartzite head of the God Amun, its features reminiscent of the Pharaoh Tutankhamen, a device used to align the ruling King with deities, will lead Christie’s sale of exceptional treasures on Thursday.

The head was once part of a statue of the god Amun, the most important deity of the New Kingdom – and I hope it will inspire readers to visit the new Discovering Ancient Egypt exhibition at Montrose Museum (which runs to September 7 with free entry).

The head dates to the 18th dynasty, reign of Tutankhamen, circa 1333-1323 BC. Its distinctive crown, which would have been surmounted by tall double feathers, is part of the god’s iconography. Over 3000 years old, this exceptional representation of the King, which is about a foot high, will be sold from the Resandro Collection, one of the world’s most renowned private collections of Egyptian art, part of which was dispersed in 2016 by Christie’s for over £3 million.

The facial features – the full mouth with slightly drooping lower lips, and almond-shaped, slanted eyes, with a deep depression between the eyes and eyebrows – are those of Tutankhamen. Similar representations of the God Amun also with facial features of the young king, were carved for the temple of Karnak in Upper Egypt.

Tutankhamen was nine years old when he became Pharaoh and reigned between 1333 and 1323BC. This period is considered the golden age of ancient Egypt, not only in terms of regional and cultural influence, but also because of the incomparable beauty and quality of the art produced then.

The head is expected to realise over £4 million when it goes under the hammer – so to speak – in London on Thursday.

Picture: Head of the god Amun (Christie’s).

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]