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SPONSORED: How to help and protect Scotland’s broken animals

Photos of dog Red. How you can help protect Scotland's animals in need

“Animals can’t tell us where it hurts, why they’re sick or why they’re scared. It’s our job to uncover what has happened to the animals and what treatment they need.”

Every year in Scotland, thousands of animals – whether domestic or stray – are found in need of rehabilitation and love.

It’s the job of the Scottish SPCA, to protect Scotland’s animals and put these broken creatures back together, both literally and metaphorically.

Red needed months of veterinary care

One of the animals who arrived broken at the Scottish SPCA was Red the saluki cross. Found abandoned on a single track road in Dunfermline, he was very skinny and lethargic.

When found, Red was severely skinny with swollen joints and a fever.
When found, Red was severely skinny with swollen joints and a fever.

An exam by a vet revealed that Red was suffering from painful, swollen joints, dental disease and a fever, believed to be caused by an infection. He needed months of veterinary care; if Red had been cared for at a private veterinary clinic, it would have cost in excess of £5,000.

Senior vet, Jo Neilson, said: “Red was in our care for nine months while we investigated and then treated for his various medical problems.

“This included him having a relapse when we thought we might lose him. He was diagnosed with an autoimmune condition and needed a long course of treatment and regular blood tests but thankfully he pulled through.

“Our teams get very emotionally invested in the animals we care for and it’s [uncertain] times like these that are the hardest.”

Indeed, such is the bond built up between carers and animals, one of the veterinary care assistants, Lynsey, fell in love with Red and couldn’t bear to be parted with him.

Red went home with Lynsey and now has all the love he could ask for.

Red's life is now filled with love thanks to the work of the Scottish SPCA.
Red’s life is now filled with love thanks to the work of the Scottish SPCA.

Help protect Scotland’s broken animals

Many more animals are found with fractured limbs, swollen joints and other physical ailments needing immediate attention. Others are found with a broken spirit, terrified and shaken, in need of love and patience.

“Red’s story is not an isolated case,” explains Jo. “Many animals arrive with us when they are literally broken.”

“Some have suffered for a long time, carrying physical and emotional scars. Animals can’t tell us where it hurts, why they’re sick or why they’re scared.

“It’s our job to uncover what has happened to the animals and what treatment they need.”

Sadly, the Scottish SPCA cares for almost 20,000 animals per year. Some arrive with diseases, others with accidental wounds and some arrive with intentional injuries inflicted by humans.vets help to protect Scotland's animals Jo Neilson working with a furry friend.

But the organisation will do everything it can to rehabilitate each creature which comes through its doors and protect Scotland’s animals. However long it takes.

In order to provide this vital service, however, the Scottish SPCA needs your help. Veterinary care can cost up to thousands of pounds per animal. And, as Scotland’s animal welfare charity receives no government funding, it depends solely on the generation of donors up and down the country.

The Scottish SPCA’s Broken campaign is the perfect way to donate money which will help vets care for and protect Scotland’s animals in need.

Jo says: “To see the broken animals who arrive with us go on to loving forever homes is the reason we do what we do.

“We don’t just fix broken bones. We fix broken hearts too.”


To find out more on how you can help the Scottish SPCA provide the care and patience needed to save and protect Scotland’s broken animals, take a look at SPCA latest campaign