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SPONSORED: New Mitsubishi is the “standout SUV in the showroom” – and on the road

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If you’re looking for a Qashqai-class family SUV but want something a little different, Mitsubishi’s Eclipse Cross offers an interesting alternative and you can test drive this from your local Richard Lawson Autoecosse Mitsubishi dealer in Dundee or Perth.

The Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross is easily the most class-competitive SUV that Mitsubishi makes. Stand-out styling, an efficient 1.5-litre turbo petrol engine and plush equipment levels are all strong points. So look beyond the Qashqai and SEAT Ateca models that rule the mid-size volume-branded Crossover class, and consider Mitsubishi’s Eclipse.

Many of the volume makers are pretty committed to SUVs these days, but Mitsubishi is a brand even more focused on this genre than most. Apart from the rare Mirage Juro citycar, every model in its line-up is an SUV, with none of them more important than the contender we’re going to look at here, the Eclipse Cross.

This was the last design that Mitsubishi engineered before it was enveloped by the Renault Nissan Alliance, which means that very probably, it will be remembered as the last car the Japanese brand developed entirely on its own. It’s certainly an important model, pitched directly into the Qashqai class of family hatchback-based SUVs that have been primarily responsible for driving sales of this genre.

As for performance, well the manual 2WD model makes 62mph from rest in 10.3s en route to 127mph flat out.

Car reviewers like the styling of this Eclipse Cross – and think buyers will too. It’s the work of the company’s new design chief Tsunehiro Kunimoto and is certainly more distinctive than the Mitsubishi norm. The Japanese maker claims it’s a ‘radically new direction’ for the genre, which may be over-stating things a bit. Still, the look is sleek and not too generic, particularly nice touches including the extended wheel arches and the split-rear screen.

Richard Lawson Jnr of Richard Lawson Autoecosse Mitsubishi has driven the car and he told The Courier: We’re delighted to welcome the Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross to our showroom and its combination of style, space, outstanding safety and value, coupled with a high level of standard equipment, is already proving a hit with customers.

Inside, you’re treated to what the brand describes as a ‘cockpit-style driving environment’ (pictured above); it’s certainly a lot nicer in terms of perceived quality than the interiors you’ll find in a first generation ASX or Mitsubishi’s more expensive Outlander model.

At the back, rear seat passengers are treated to slide-and-recline adjustment for the 60:40 split rear seat; in fact, the rear seat back has eight different recline settings. The boot is wide but shallow, and will only take 341-litres of luggage, a little below the class standard. Still, it’ll probably be sufficient for most likely owners.

As you’d expect, prices are class-competitive, though Mitsubishi hasn’t made any attempt to offer a really basic version priced against entry-level derivatives of segment leaders like the Nissan Qashqai or the SEAT Ateca. So for potential Eclipse Cross buyers, prices start at just over £21,000 for the entry-level ‘2’-spec variant, and Richard Lawson Autoecosse can help you find your perfect HP or PCP Mitsubishi finance package.

For example, choose a 36-month term, pay a £3,000 deposit and you can drive off in the Eclipse Cross for just over £240-a-month (PCP) or £500-a-month (HP) (based on 10,000 annual mileage). Log on to its finance calculator or pop into the dealership to discuss the best option for you.

 

All Eclipse Cross variants are well specified, with even the entry-level ‘2’ version offering niceties like a rear view camera, a DAB radio with six speakers, cruise control, climate control air conditioning, 16-inch alloy wheels, privacy glass and a ‘Smartphone Display Audio’ infotainment set-up that’s compatible with the ‘Apple CarPlay’ and ‘Android Auto’ smartphone mirroring systems.

To summarise, the Eclipse Cross is has stylish looks, strong levels of equipment, state-of-the-art safety provision and a long warranty making this Crossover stand out in the showrooms. In the Qashqai-class, not everyone wants a Qashqai. Widen your shopping brief and include this contender; it’ll represent an interesting alternative to the segment benchmark.

Richard Lawson added: For anyone who’s considering upgrading their car to a new SUV, the Eclipse Cross is the perfect choice and we invite people to call in and experience it for themselves.”

*To organise your test drive of the new Eclipse at Richard Lawson Mitsubishi, which has branches in Burrelton, Perth PH13 9NX and Dundee, DD4 8ED, visit the Richard Lawson Autoecosse Mitsubishi website.

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