Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Angus leads way as house prices hit new high

Post Thumbnail

House prices in Angus have reached a new peak as buyers switched from flats to detached properties.

The average house price in Angus increased from £153,621 in January 2016 to £159,739 in December (2.4%) and up to £163,567 (6.5%) in January 2017.

New data from Your Move’s Scotland House Price Index shows that the average house price in Scotland is now £171,407 a 1.5% growth since last year and a 0.1% growth since January.

The most popular property type purchased in Angus is detached homes, which accounted for 34% of sales in 2016, up from 32% in 2015.

The increase in the proportion of detached homes sold, with flats losing market share, has resulted in the average price for the area reaching its new peak.

The report said: “Exactly half of the 32 local authority areas saw prices rise in January, led by Inverclyde, up 5.3%.

“The only area to reach a new peak, though, was Angus as buyers switched from flats to detached properties.”

It continued: “Angus experienced price increases (up 2.4% over the month) with good quality properties in Montrose and Hillside being particularly popular.

“This can be attributed to the Aberdeenshire market drop over recent years which resulted in more properties coming to the market in Angus as additional supply has counteracted the slight drop in demand.

“Buyers also moved south from Aberdeenshire for more affordable housing.”

However, Buy to Let investment reduced in Angus in January due to the increased costs and changes in legislation.

Ex-council houses in the area are still popular with first time buyers, which allowed sellers of these properties to upsize.

Christine Campbell, Your Move managing director in Scotland, said: “Relatively slow house price growth in Scotland is proving a blessing for first-time buyers.

“The early indications are that they’re using the opportunity to get on the ladder, helping to sustain transaction numbers.

“It will be interesting to see how talks of another Scottish referendum play out, and whether or not it has an impact on buyer and seller appetite to make a move now, or indeed, in the future.”

The average price in Perth and Kinross was £186,294 in January 2016 which increased to £187,954 in December but went down to £187,767 in January 2017.

In Fife the figure was £152,656 in January 2016 which went down to £149,204 in December before increasing slightly £149,385.

Dundee prices were up 9.2% for the year from £131,925 in January 2016 to £144,430 in December before the price dropped to £144,019 in January 2017.

 

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]