Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Care and repair charity’s dementia service ‘really making a difference’

Members of the Angus Care and Repair board. Back (l-r) Jim Johnstone (chairman), Judith Leslie (manager) Calum McNicoll (vice chair) John Ness. Front (l-r) Margaret Mitchell MBE, Councillor Sheila Hands and Councillor Gavin Nicol.
Members of the Angus Care and Repair board. Back (l-r) Jim Johnstone (chairman), Judith Leslie (manager) Calum McNicoll (vice chair) John Ness. Front (l-r) Margaret Mitchell MBE, Councillor Sheila Hands and Councillor Gavin Nicol.

An Angus service is providing a better picture of what can be done to help people with early-stage dementia live safely at home.

Angus Care and Repair chairman Jim Johnston told the charity’s annual general meeting in Forfar on Tuesday that its dementia enablement service is “really making a difference”.

The group carries out modifications to the homes of elderly and disabled people in Angus to help their quality of life and maintain independence.

Mr Johnston told the AGM: “Last year we announced the significant work that we were embarking on with the Life Changes Trust funding us to help people living with dementia.

“The University of the West of Scotland completed a fantastic piece of work which was launched at the housing and dementia summit which was held in Perth this June.

“This followed work funded by the Chartered Institute of Housing researching and developing training for housing professionals to assist people with dementia to receive better and focused support at an earlier stage.

“All the partners that were involved are maintaining the momentum with additional meetings to influence housing policy, heighten dementia publicity and de-stigmatise what is a very common but challenging condition to live with and care for.

“The Trust also funded our dementia enablement service which is really making a difference.

“We have already received 284 referrals to the service — 75% of these are from the dementia post diagnostic team or social work.

“I mention this as I think it is important to remember — especially in these challenging times — that Angus has some wonderful partnerships and joint working between voluntary, statutory and private sectors.

“This enablement service is being duplicated in Aberdeen City and Lochaber, Lochalsh and Skye to demonstrate the way to carry the service out in rural and urban areas and (manager) Judith (Leslie) assures me that the cooperation, interest and enthusiasm shown among the general public and professionals in Angus has far exceeded the other areas.

“It is also giving a better picture of what we can do to help people living with dementia at an early stage to remain safely at home.”

Mr Johnston, who served his first year as chairman, said the funding lasts for another 18 months.

He described 2016/17 as “a very hectic year once again with new initiatives, new staff and new partners”.

Through its service level agreement with Angus Council the charity assisted just over 2000 clients.

Just under half were referred through the social work department and Mr Johnston stressed the importance of identifying people before they are in need of services ”so that we can prevent slips, trips, falls or accidents”.

Mr Johnston said the small repairs service is not as busy as it was when it was free but still provides clients with a “highly skilled, considerate and trusted service”.

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]