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Balaclava-wearing football yobs went on rampage in Dundee city centre

Balaclava-wearing football yobs went on rampage in Dundee city centre

Boozy football fans — some wearing balaclavas — alarmed passers-by and forced traffic to stop in Dundee city centre.

The group of St Johnstone supporters were on their way to see their team play Dundee at Dens Park.

Some of them walked in the middle of the road, causing disorder — including Liam McCallum, 23, of Viewfield Place, Perth, and a 17-year-old male who can’t be named for legal reasons.

McCallum, who was wearing a balaclava, also walked across the top of a parked car.

The pair appeared at Dundee Sheriff Court charged with disorderly conduct and breach of the peace.

They both admitted the charges against them.

Fiscal depute Colin Wilson said the duo were walking on the road, along with other members of the group, causing traffic to stop as they moved through the city centre.

The pair caused disruption to motorists and fear and alarm to passers-by in Marketgait, South Marketgait, Nethergate, High Street, Murraygate, Cowgate and Princes Street.

The younger male has posted photos on social media of the St Johnstone “ultras” group Fair City Unity — which was warned by the club last month over its behaviour.

Although praised for improving the atmosphere at McDiarmid Park, members were told to stop “fighting with opposition support” and engaging in “unruly behaviour in public streets and on public transport”.

McCallum’s solicitor Jim Caird told the court his client had been drinking before the incident on Hogmanay.

He added: “He was wearing a balaclava at the time. It’s difficult to say why. He hasn’t given a reason.

“He was participating in horseplay and showing off to other members in the group rather than trying to cause fear.”

Solicitor Jim Laverty, defending the teenager, said the youth had also drunk alcohol and became “swept away” by events.

He added: “He was caught up in the euphoria of the situation.

“His team was playing against Dundee and the love for one’s team playing a local rival can bring about some feeling of euphoria.”

Sheriff Alastair Carmichael deferred sentence until August 3 for both to be of good behaviour.

https://www.eveningtelegraph.co.uk/fp/teen-admits-offensive-behaviour-swearing-street-way-dundee-fc-match/

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