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New statue to commemorate lifeboat crews unveiled in Broughty Ferry

Mark Flynn convener of Dundee City Council's city development committee, Robin Smith MBE former crew member of the lifeboat Mona and RNLI Broughty Ferry President David Martin in front of the new statue.
Mark Flynn convener of Dundee City Council's city development committee, Robin Smith MBE former crew member of the lifeboat Mona and RNLI Broughty Ferry President David Martin in front of the new statue.

A new statue memorialising the work of Broughty Ferry’s lifeboat crew has been unveiled.

The sculpture, which was revealed to the public on Thursday afternoon, is part of the Ferry’s multimillion-pound flood defence scheme.

Located on Beach Crescent, the art depicts lifeboat davits – the wooden cranes used to hold emergency boats in place – which form an archway framing a view of the Broughty Ferry’s RNLI base.

Inscribed on the statue are the names of the 12 lifeboats which have harboured at the inshore station since its creation in the late 1850s.

Statue commemorates hard work of Broughty Ferry lifeboat crew

City development convener Mark Flynn attended the unveiling, alongside new coxswain Peter Hay and former crew member Robin Smith MBE, who served on the tragic Mona lifeboat.

The Ferry’s lifeboat station is currently home to two volunteer-staffed vessels – the Trent class all-weather Elizabeth of Glamis and the D class in-shone lifeboat Oor Lifesaver.

Mr Flynn said: “It is crucial that we not only ensure effectiveness and value for money when delivering flood protection for our coastal communities but also that any scheme is attractive and in keeping with the buildings and streetscape around it.

Drone footage of latest progress made on £15m Broughty Ferry flood defences project.
Drone footage of the £15m Broughty Ferry flood defences project.

“The inclusion of relevant and engaging public art is part of that process and I am delighted to see the sculpture unveiled in its context today for the first time.”

Mr Hay added: “It’s great to see not just the practical side of the scheme, which allows us as a crew better access to the lifeboat station, but also to see the work of the lifeboat in the Ferry down the years commemorated in such an outstanding way.”

Art piece part of multimillion-pound scheme

The statue also marks one of the final phases in the Ferry’s flood prevention scheme.

Work on £15.5 million development began three years ago, and the project is now nearing completion.

The scheme is designed to protect the seaside area from high tides and flooding while promoting active travel.

Peter Hay, the new coxswain the Broughty Ferry lifeboat.

Much of the work has been undertaken by Belfast-based firm McLaughlin and Harvey.

Director Seamus Devlin said: “We are proud to attend this official opening of our flood protection works at Broughty Ferry.

“There has been a significant transformation to the local area and we have particularly enjoyed seeing members of the public enjoying the new walkway.”

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