Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Street art project to turn city pends into stone canvasses

Gregor Thomson painting the rear exterior of the Quirky Coo in Couttie's Wynd.
Gregor Thomson painting the rear exterior of the Quirky Coo in Couttie's Wynd.

A street art project inspired by the Ramblas of Barcelona will look to attract people to some of Dundee’s hidden architectural gems.

Shop fronts, door ways, roller shutters and external walls of some of the city’s hidden wynds and pends are to be transformed with murals and works of art as part of the Open Close project.

So far, a roller door behind Quirky Coo on Couttie’s Wynd has been decorated by local artist Gregor Thomson.

The fine art student at Dundee University’s Duncan of Jordanstone is one of six local artists and designers signed up to take part in the project.

Their work will adorn buildings in “hidden” closes and properties including PDQ on Meadowside, the Butterfly Cafe on Commercial Street, a door on Sugarhouse Wynd and a pend behind the Bank of Scotland building on the High Street.

The Open Close project hopes to create a map of all the buildings and closes which have been decorated with the art works, with the idea of attracting people to places they do not normally visit.

Organiser Russell Pepper said he felt inspired to start the project after spending time in the Spanish city Barcelona, and took heart from the positive reception a similar street art project in Aberdeen has received.

He said: “With all this positivity, in addition to Dundee’s booming creative scene – not to mention the soon-to-open V&A – we believe it is high time Dundee saw some street art of its own.

“With funding from Place Partnership Dundee, we are organising a trial project of six doors in lanes, closes and alleyways around the city centre.

“We want to brighten up these areas which are prone to vandalism, while encouraging locals and visitors alike to discover or re-discover Dundee.

“Another bonus is that doors which have been painted actually discourage vandalism and tagging, as taggers are far less likely to target areas with art already in place.

“We would like to have all this in place in time for Dundee Design Festival at the end of May, which we realise is a tight time frame, but we have our artists and funding secured, as well as the backing of the council who have assured us of a discretionary approach to planning permission due to the common good of this project.”

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]