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‘We just don’t know if they will ever come home’ – Dundee twins have never left hospital after being born with heart condition

Five month old twins Natasha and Hermione Sutcliffe both have a congenital heart condition, ventricular septal defect (VSD).
Five month old twins Natasha and Hermione Sutcliffe both have a congenital heart condition, ventricular septal defect (VSD).

These beautiful twin baby girls have never left hospital as they desperately need open heart surgery but are not strong enough for operations.

Tiny twins Natasha and Hermione Sutcliffe were born five months ago to parents Matthew, 30, and wife Gemma, 32, from Dundee, but have a congenital heart condition, ventricular septal defect (VSD).

The parents knew there was a risk the twins could be born seriously ill, as Matthew’s family has a history of heart problems.

But they never anticipated the heartache they are experiencing as Gemma stays in Dundee looking after their other four other children while Matthew is by the twins’ side in Glasgow.

Due to money worries, Gemma has seen her baby daughters fewer than five times in the five weeks they have been treated in the Queen Elizabeth University Hospital Glasgow.

They have no indication yet of when they will be well enough to leave hospital, or even have surgery – but finally both twins are off life-support in hospital.

Natasha was taken off this week and moved to a ward to join her sister – a glimmer of hope that they may soon be moved to Ninewells Hospital in Dundee, where they were born.

Matthew said: “We just don’t know if they will ever come home.

“When they were in Ninewells, my other kids got to visit them every day, we even spent Christmas with them at the hospital because we couldn’t take them home.

“But since they have arrived in Glasgow, the children have seen them about two times and Gemma has only seen them once or twice.

“We really want them to get the surgery but it’s not about the size of them, it’s more about how strong they are, so hopefully they don’t pick up other infections.

“The next operation will be the open heart surgery and doctors plan to do that in the next three to six months but it all depends on their health.”

Gemma and Matthew are raising funds to buy equipment to help the twins hit the milestones they have missed.

To donate, visit www.uk.gofundme.com

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