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New information signs at Dundee Law as old ones were over the hill

Councillor Anne Rendall, Colin Donald and Laura Jane Blackie, who illustrated the plaques, - both DCC Countryside Rangers, beside one of the new plaques at the top of Dundee Law.
Councillor Anne Rendall, Colin Donald and Laura Jane Blackie, who illustrated the plaques, - both DCC Countryside Rangers, beside one of the new plaques at the top of Dundee Law.

New information signs have been unveiled at one of Dundee’s most iconic attractions, prompted by the city’s changing landscape.

The new plaques at the peak of Dundee Law were unveiled yesterday. They give visitors a clearer understanding of what they can see as they look out over the city and the River Tay towards Fife.

The new signs are part of the Dundee Law Heritage Project. The Friends of Dundee Law, who are part of the project, have worked on a range of improvements in the last three years.

The old signs had been at the viewpoint for more than 25 years and had become worn and difficult to read in that time.

The city has seen many changes in the past few decades, including the erection of the V&A and the razing of Tayside House.

Landmarks old and new are pointed out as well so visitors to the city know what they they are looking at from Dundee’s highest point.

The signs are now more accurate. For example, one explains the Law is not an extinct volcano, contrary to urban myth. Rather, it was formed from volcanic rock that flowed from a volcano to the west of the area. This was then trapped under ice, higher than the Law itself, thousands of years ago.

The Law viewpoint information also explains the wildlife visitors can see. Other new signs show the location of the Law Tunnel.

Kevin Cordell, neighbourhood services convener, said: “This is a great way to help locals and visitors alike understand what they can see from the top of Law.

“The city has been through so many changes and as we welcome more people to the city, it is important that we explain what Dundee is now.”

SNP councillor Anne Rendall said: “It’s good that the myth of the Law being a volcano has been dispelled. I’m sure that won’t affect it being a popular visitor attraction.

“The city has changed before our eyes, so the old signs needed a bit of updating and freshening up.

“I would really like to commend the work of the Friends of Law Hill. They do a lot of brilliant work, such as cleaning up the Law.

“It’s a fantastic tourist attraction. I don’t know too many other places where you can get a 360 degree view of a city.”

The money for the restored signs came in part from the Heritage Lottery Fund.

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