IN PHOTOS: Angus welcomes the New Year with a wild mix of fire and water

Carnoustie’s New Year dook doubled as a birthday bash for the hardy revellers who took the plunge to celebrate a tradition started 25 years ago.

© Paul Reid
The race to water at the 25th Carnoustie Dook.

Rod Bruce and Peter Christie of the town’s rugby club began the dook fundraiser as a way of generating cash for a midi-rugby tour to France, and carried on the tradition between them for a couple of years before others were bold enough to join in the North Sea fun.

© Paul Reid
Rod Bruce
© Paul Reid
The 2019 Carnoustie Dook.

The January 1 event has become a firm favourite and the pair were back in the water alongside a great turnout of fellow dookers who took the plunge in the race to be first to the rugby ball kicked into the sea by club president Colin Murray as the traditional start to the dook.

© Paul Reid
The 2019 Carnoustie Dook.

It was quickly gathered by Cory Thom, with Sarah Thomson winning the fancy dress prize for her Day of the Dead get-up.

But the brrrravest dooker was Carnoustie High School 13-year-old Michelle Hunter, who hopped around in the waves for a remarkable 25 minutes to claim the prize as the person who stayed in the water for the greatest length of time.

© Paul Reid
Michelle Hunter, who stayed in the sea the longest.

Joint event founders Rod and Peter said they had been thrilled with the response to the 25th anniversary dook.

“I think people enjoy it because it’s such an informal dook and more people come every year so we’re really chuffed with how it has gone,” said Peter.

Rod added: ” For the first few years it was just the two of us who did it, and then I said I’d wait for the 25 anniversary and do it again, so I couldn’t say I wasn’t doing it this year.

“It was great fun and we’re really pleased to see so many families take part and come to watch.”

Arbroath

In Arbroath, dozens went for a dip near the town harbour in the latest Loony Dook for Cancer Research.

© Wallace Ferrier
The RNLI team at Arbroath with some of those who took to the water.

The local RNLI crew played their annual support role in the successful event, looking after regulars and first-timers, many in fancy dress.

Stonehaven

© DC Thomson
PyroCeltica perform their fire show at Stonehaven

Stonehaven’s spectacular fireballs ceremony attracted another international influx, with visitors lining the street for the parade from the town centre to the harbour where the blazing globes were launched into the North Sea.

© DC Thomson
The fireball festival on Stonehaven High Street.

The event celebrates the tradition of the old spirits being burned off and launched into a watery farewell, clearing the way for fresh new spirits to arrive at the turn of the new year.

Yesterday the harbour played host to the town’s Nippy Dip.

The Stoney gathering is one of 20 attractions across Scotland to have shared in a six-figure winter festivals boost which will run to Burns night.

© DC Thomson
Stonehaven’s 2019 Nippy Dip.
© DC Thomson
Stonehaven’s 2019 Nippy Dip.

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