Perth woman with incurable cancer embarks on fundraising drive

Fiona begins the Walk in Her Name

A Perth woman who has incurable cancer has bravely embarked on a fundraising drive for charity.

Fiona Munro, 31, was diagnosed with stage four ovarian cancer in January last year but was determined to take part in a walk on the North Inch in Perth at the weekend, when she was joined by around 50 people.

The 5K walk took place at Perths North Inch
The 5K walk took place at Perths North Inch

Despite receiving the shattering news that she was suffering from incurable cancer, Mrs Munro is determined to spread awareness of the illness.

“In January 2016, I was diagnosed with stage four ovarian cancer at the age of 30,” she said.

“I am passionate about raising money for Ovarian Cancer Action as they are one of two UK charities dedicated to funding ovarian cancer research and awareness. They put a call out to invite people to organise walks called #WalkInHerName to help with their fundraising.

“So I got in touch and said I’d organise a walk and then when I posted the details on my Facebook page the response was incredible.”

The effort was made to raise funds for Ovarian Cancer Action
The effort was made to raise funds for Ovarian Cancer Action

And Mrs Munro spoke of the support she has had since posting about her illness on social media.

“People who have been reading my story since my diagnosis, plus my friends, family and also people affected by ovarian cancer all came along to raise money and awareness,” she added.

“There were some people who did the walk on Sunday in memory of a relative who died from cancer and others who are receiving treatment just now.”

Fiona was joined by fellow fighter Alison Casey
Fiona was joined by fellow fighter Alison Casey

She continued: “My aim is to help women to get diagnosed earlier. I kept getting told that I was too young to have ovarian cancer but had symptoms like getting up through the night to go to the toilet, having a lack of energy and abdominal swelling.

“It has subtle changes, which is why it is called the silent killer. I was diagnosed so late, my cancer is incurable, but I hope that other women will be diagnosed earlier so that they can have more effective treatment.

“I’m in remission just now so the staff at Ninewells Hospital are keeping an eye on it — they’ve been exceptional.”

Mrs Munro was awarded Scotland’s Fundraiser of the Year last year and will receive Macmillan Cancer’s highest Scottish award later this month.

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