Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

New all-terrain cycle will help Perth inclusivity group conquer new ground

Cycling Without Age CEO Christine Bell takes 83-year-old Norman Ridley for a spin on the Paratreker Trail.
Cycling Without Age CEO Christine Bell takes 83-year-old Norman Ridley for a spin on the Paratreker Trail.

A Perth-based cycling group will be able to take its service users off the beaten track as bosses unveil a new all-terrain cycle.

Cycling Without Age has previously been using a trio of motorised tri-shaws in Perth to take elderly and disabled people out for a spin.

The contraptions feature a padded double seat at the front for two clients, while a volunteer pedals the vehicle from behind.

The busy group had been restricted to paved surfaces but this month, welcomed the arrival of a Paratreker Trail, an all surface wheelchair.

With two ultra-durable rear tyres and a smaller front wheel for steering and support, the machine has been tried and tested in the Cairngorms and has even made it to the summit of Arthur’s Seat and is now being rolled out to Cycling Without Age groups across Scotland.

The organisation’s Perth chapter has been trialling the rugged equipment, with 83-year-old local ambassador Norman Ridley enjoying a successful trip through the forest at Quarry Mill Woodland Park.

Lanark-based creators GM4X worked on designing the equipment with Strathclyde and Heriot Watt Universities.

Organisers hope they can capitalise on the cycling frenzy which has taken over cities around the world during lockdown and include people who would struggle to cycle on their own.

CEO Christine Bell said: “Tri-shaws are fantastic for what we use them to do, but they can’t go all-terrain.

“As soon as we found out about these, we were interested. They’re absolutely ideal for the pump tracks that are being installed in towns and villages everywhere.

“These enable people with mobility restrictions to join in and makes cycling more inclusive.”

Creator Gordon McGregor added: “It provides adventure to people who might not manage otherwise and it gets rid of the labels that come with being disabled.”

The Cycling Without Age movement started in Denmark in 2012 and has now spread to 50 countries. It arrived in Scotland in 2017 when the first group was launched in Falkirk.

The group have around 20 volunteers in Perth and are on the lookout for more. To get in touch with the charity, call 01324 467272.

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]