Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner. Facebook Messenger An icon of the facebook messenger app logo. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Facebook Messenger An icon of the Twitter app logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. WhatsApp Messenger An icon of the Whatsapp messenger app logo. Email An icon of an mail envelope. Copy link A decentered black square over a white square.

Thieves turning elsewhere as Perthshire housebreakings plummet over summer

Post Thumbnail

Around half as many houses were broken into in Perth and Kinross this summer as in the year before, police have revealed.

Between the start of April and the end of August, the figure fell from 48 incidents to 27.

Since the beginning of last month, another seven housebreakings have been reported.

Police say this “represents a significant reduction” in reported crime compared to 2019 figures and remains well below the five-year average.

The latest statistics have maintained Perth and Kinross’ position as significantly lower than the national average.

Officers say recorded crimes are split equally between the city and wider Perthshire, and that times and days of the week when crimes are committed vary.

Thieves targeted 127 vehicles over the summer – similar to the previous quarter – and an “overwhelming number” of thefts from vehicles saw phones, tools and
smaller electronic devices stolen after they had been left in full view in unattended vehicles.

Police say while small numbers of vehicles are believed to be stolen as part of organised crime activity across Scotland, the most common method remains appropriation of the
keys from associates or family or at house parties.

While homes have been targeted less frequently by thieves, shoplifting rates have returned to pre-lockdown levels, with alcohol remaining “by far” the most frequently stolen item.

Addressing councillors this week, local area commander Chief Inspector Graham Binnie explained items most regularly stolen from houses continue to be those which can be easily carried by the perpetrator such as cash, phones, bank cards and in some cases, prescribed medication.

He said: “Our acquisitive crime levels in terms of housebreakings are well down, in terms of last year[‘s figures].

“We’ve launched an operation in the last couple of months to target acquisitive crime and we’ve had some notable successes in targeting individuals who have been involved in, or responsible for, a series of break-ins to cars and break-ins to properties.

“That operation continues and there’s been a notable link to criminality in Edinburgh about the¬†theft of bicycles, which we’ve seen notably increase this summer, not just in Perth and Kinross but nationally.”

While the vast majority of bicycles stolen have been unattended, some have been
targeted in house breakings.

Police say that with the summer months behind them, this spate is levelling out.