Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Police chief underlines importance of gun amnesty

Chief Inspector Ian Scott.
Chief Inspector Ian Scott.

A police chief has underlined the importance of a firearms amnesty, describing it as being “particularly relevant” to Tayside and Fife due to its large rural area.

Chief Inspector Ian Scott, area commander for Perth and Kinross, was speaking before the launch of the National Firearms Surrender Campaign, which begins at 7am on Monday and will run for two weeks, finishing at 11.59pm on July 1.

The aim of the campaign is to remove firearms from criminal use. Residents who possess firearms, including shotguns, and ammunition for which they do not hold a valid certificate will be able to hand these over to the police.

In addition, people will be able to surrender replica firearms, BB guns, imitation firearms and bullets.

A previous gun amnesty, held in June 2016, resulted in more than 12,500 weapons being handed into police stations across Scotland and was deemed a great success.

Mr Scott explained why he thinks the move is vital to areas such as Perth and Kinross, Angus and Fife.

“This firearms amnesty is particularly relevant to Perth and Kinross where we have a large rural area where individuals may have historically have kept some form of weapon for pest control, or stored a gun in an out-building,” he commented.

“They will now have the opportunity to have them safely dealt with as part of the surrender campaign, which is designed to improve public safety.”

He continued: “As the campaign operates on an amnesty at the point of surrender of the firearm to Police Scotland, approval has been granted by the Lord Advocate to run the campaign during the stipulated time period only.”

Mr Scott stated the terms ‘surrender and amnesty’ are often interchangeable but pointed out the difference between the two words for the purposes of the campaign.

“The term ‘amnesty’ exists only at the point of surrender of the firearm to the police and does not provide an amnesty for the lifetime of the firearm,” he added.

This means that police will accept a firearm which is being handed in for disposal as part of the campaign and provide a limited immunity (amnesty) for possession of that firearm at the point of surrender – generally at a police station – or by pre-arranged collection from a home address.

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]