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Eurovision Song Contest: How the voting works

Eurovision hosts Mika, Laura Pausini and Alessandro Cattelan (Giulio Rustichelli/Eurovision)
Eurovision hosts Mika, Laura Pausini and Alessandro Cattelan (Giulio Rustichelli/Eurovision)

The Eurovision Song Contest is well known for its fiendishly complex voting system.

Here is how it works:

Viewers from all participating countries will be invited to vote for their favourite songs on the night of the grand finale on Saturday May 14.

Fans can vote over the phone, by text or via the Eurovision app, available on devices including iOS, Android and Windows.

AJ Odudu
AJ Odudu is the UK’s spokeswoman this year (PA)

Each person can vote up to 20 times but voters will be unable to select their own country’s entry.

The public votes make up 50% of the total vote, with the other half determined by a professional jury in each participating country.

The experts’ scores are based on the Friday night jury final performances, which are not usually televised.

After viewers have cast their votes, a national spokesperson from the participating countries will be called in to present the points of their professional jury – which range from the maximum “douze points” (12) to zero.

TV presenter and Strictly Come Dancing finalist AJ Odudu is the UK’s spokeswoman this year.

After the presentation of the scores from the juries, the public points from all participating countries will be combined, providing one score for each song.

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