Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Assets not designed for extreme weather, says Scottish Water as charges increase

Households across Scotland are facing a 4.2% increase in water charges (Peter Byrne/PA)
Households across Scotland are facing a 4.2% increase in water charges (Peter Byrne/PA)

Households across Scotland are facing a 4.2% increase in water charges as Scottish Water looks to invest in their assets they say were “never designed” for extreme weather we now see.

In the organisation’s annual report for 2021/22, published this week, chief executive Douglas Millican said it would be “wrong” to treat last year’s extreme weather such as Storm Arwen, which impacted areas of north east Scotland, as “exceptional”.

Mr Millican, who is set to step down as chief executive of the body after 10 years, said weather events that used to happen once in every 30 or 50 years are happening “much more frequently”.

He added: “Our teams work exceptionally hard to cope with the impact of the changing weather while maintaining vital services.

“Looking ahead, with each significant storm or extended dry period it is becoming more apparent just how much we need to invest in and improve our assets, some of which are many decades old, to ensure our customers’ receive the high quality services they expect.”

“If we are to replace our ageing assets and keep pace with the impacts of climate change, higher levels of investment in our water and waste water assets are vital.”

Customers will face a 4.5% increase to water bills this year which works out an average of £16 per year for those living in band C properties.

Scottish Water said last year was their most challenging and extreme weather impacted their ability to deliver services across Scotland.

Last year saw the tail end of a very cold winter, dry spring and summer and then a “deluge” of rainstorms with November 2021 bringing Storm Arwen.

Scottish Labour deputy leader Jackie Baillie said: “The increase in water charges come at a time when households all over Scotland are struggling to put food on the table and Scottish Water are sitting on half a billion pounds of reserves and handing out eye-watering bonuses to executives.

“Of course we need to futureproof our infrastructure, but that shouldn’t be done off the backs of those who are trying to cope with the worst cost-of-living crisis in recent memory.

“These rip-off price hikes have piled pressure on to households when they need it least, leaving them to make impossible choices.

“The buck for this stops with SNP ministers, who made the shameful decision to nod these increases through. This is before next year’s expected rises when Scottish Water are expected to double the increase. The SNP must give a commitment to cancelling those rises now.

“Once again the SNP have the power to fix the problem but their rhetoric on the cost of living crisis has proven to be nothing more than empty words.”

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]