Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner. Facebook Messenger An icon of the facebook messenger app logo. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Facebook Messenger An icon of the Twitter app logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. WhatsApp Messenger An icon of the Whatsapp messenger app logo. Email An icon of an mail envelope. Copy link A decentered black square over a white square.

Scots more likely to have a stroke – and to die of one, campaigners say

Cases of cerebrovascular disease have risen over the last decade, figures showed, although deaths from the condition have fallen (Jeff Moore/PA)
Cases of cerebrovascular disease have risen over the last decade, figures showed, although deaths from the condition have fallen (Jeff Moore/PA)

The number of Scots dying as a result of cerebrovascular disease, including strokes, has fallen – despite figures showing an increase in the number of cases.

Official figures showed cases of cerebrovasular disease, which includes strokes, brain haemorrhages and mini-strokes, increased from 12,596 in 2013-14 to 13,381 in 2022-23.

The figures come amid concern from campaigners at the Stroke Association that Scotland “lags its neighbours” with people north of the border “more likely to have a stroke than those elsewhere in the UK” and also being “significantly more likely to die from it”.

However, while cerebrovascular disease cases rose by 6% over the period, figures from Public Health Scotland (PHS) showed deaths from the condition fell from 4,452 in 2013 to 3,874 in 2022.

“In the last decade, the death rate for cerebrovascular disease decreased by 25%,” the organisation said in its report.

However, it added that in 2022 the death rate for cerebrovascular disease in the most deprived areas was 47% higher than it was in the least deprived areas – with this consistent with the previous five years.

Scottish Conservative health spokesperson, Dr Sandesh Gulhane, raised concerns about the “sharp and alarming rise in the rate and number of strokes in Scotland” – claiming this was “another symptom of a failing healthcare system on the SNP’s watch”.

Dr Gulhane said: “At a time when stroke cases are on the rise, the last thing we should be doing is cutting the active health budget, which the SNP have done two years running.”

Tory health spokesperson Dr Sandesh Gulhane hit out at the Scottish Government over the increase in incidence of cerebrovascular disease (Fraser Bremner/Scottish Daily Mail/PA)

Meanwhile, the Stroke Association said the proportion of strokes occurring among the working age population was rising, noting this had increased by 20% in the last 10 years.

Association director John Watson said: “It is concerning to see an increase in the number of younger people having strokes, of which around a third will be left with a lifelong disability.

“This can leave people stripped of their independence overnight, affecting everything from their ability to go back to work, to partaking in their interests and hobbies.

“There are about 10,000 strokes in Scotland each year, but to see this number increasing amongst younger people is tragic.”

He called for action from the Scottish Government, saying: “Stroke can no longer be the poor relation amongst health conditions, it needs to have greater importance placed on it for there to be a step change in our approach to improvements.”

Mr Watson added: “It continues to be a worry that Scotland lags its neighbours. Not only are people in Scotland more likely to have a stroke than those elsewhere in the UK, someone in Scotland who has a stroke is significantly more likely to die from it.

“Last year, the Scottish Government launched the progressive stroke pathway and an action plan to guide improvements in stroke care.

“We are right behind this plan, but we need to see effective leadership from the Scottish Government and health boards for positive change.

“These latest figures speak for themselves.  Stroke needs greater attention. It needs effective leadership and innovation to make change happen. We owe it to all those affected by stroke to see this through.”

Public health minister Jenni Minto said: “We have made significant progress, and mortality rates for cerebrovascular disease (including stroke) are down by one quarter over the last 10 years – but we want to do more.

“We set out our vision for minimising preventable strokes and ensuring timely and equitable access to lifesaving treatment in our refreshed stroke improvement plan last year.

“We’re also also committed to introducing a high-quality thrombectomy service and recently set out the timescales for referrals to hub hospitals and moves towards establishing a 24/7 service.”