104126 Search results for ‘qs/Allan%20Douglas/rf/sample/qt/article_slideshow/qc/tag’

Motoring news

Audi’s new Q cars

April 12 2017

Another week, another new Audi. Two new Audis, in fact. The German car maker has announced a couple more additions to its Q line up of SUVs. The Q4 is a coupe-SUV hybrid that will go up against the BMW X4 and Mercedes GLC Coupe. As its name suggests, it’ll be positioned between the compact Q3 and bigger Q5. At the other end of the scale is the Q8, which will go head to head against the Range Rover. It’s lower and sleeker than the Q7 Audi is also producing. In concept form, it sat only four people, although it seems likely the production version will be a five seater. There’s a 630 litre boot as well. Eagle eyed Audi followers will notice the only SUV slots left to fill are the Q1 and Q6. Watch this space...

This student took his Tinder profile to the next level by turning it into a PowerPoint presentation

February 21 2018

Standing out from the crowd on Tinder can be tough, but with the help of Microsoft PowerPoint a British student has managed just that – and gone viral in the process.Sam Dixey, a 21-year-old studying at Leeds University, made a six-part slideshow entitled “Why you should swipe right” – using pictures and bullet points to shrewdly persuade potential dates to match with him on the dating app. The slideshow includes discussion of his social life and likes, such as “petting doggos” and “laser tag”, and “other notable qualities and skills” – such as being “not the worst at sex” and “generous when drunk”.It even has reviews mocked up from sources such as “Donald Trump”, “Leonardo Di Capri Sun” and “The Times Guide to Pancakes 2011”.Sam told the Press Association the six-slide presentation only took about 20 minutes to make and “started off as a joke”.However, since being posted to Twitter by fellow Tinder user Gracie Barrow, Sam’s slideshow has been shared tens of thousands of times across social media.So, it’s got the seal of approval form Gracie, but how has the slideshow fared on Tinder? “I’d have to say it has been pretty successful,” Sam said. “Definitely a clear correlation of matches and dates beforehand to afterwards.“Most of the responses tend to revolve around people saying ‘I couldn’t help swipe right 10/10’ but I’ve had some people go the extra mile and message me on Facebook.“Plus some people have recognised me outside, in the library and on dates.”A resounding success.

Fife

Missing Allan Bryant: No ‘dead end’ in investigation, say police

November 4 2014

The officer leading the inquiry into missing Glenrothes man Allan Bryant has said that police have not hit a “dead end”. Chief Inspector Nicola Shepherd said lines of inquiry are continuing to be followed up on the first anniversary of Allan’s disappearance. Despite the largest missing person investigation ever undertaken in Fife, no trace of the 24-year-old has been found since he left Styx nightclub in Caskieberran Road a year ago. On Monday, as Police Scotland released enhanced CCTV footage of Alan’s last known movements, Chief Inspector Shepherd underlined the scale of the task facing her officers. Asked if the investigation had ground to a halt, she replied: “We’re definitely not at a dead end. We’re pursuing a number of lines that we can’t speak openly about. “It’s been absolutely massive from day one. I can honestly say that a Fife force would have struggled to take this forward. “The search has been huge from airborne to water searches. Hundreds of statements have been noted and it’s a major, major inquiry.” Police are hoping that the nightclub footage will help to jog memories of those who may have seen Allan on November 3 2013. Although the footage has been released before, it has been enhanced in the hope that it will be shared on social media, a platform which the Bryant family has successfully utilised to publicise the search for their son. The family also displayed a teddy bear made out of articles of Allan’s clothing, an item they poignantly held on to throughout a press conference at police headquarters in Glenrothes. It came just hours after a candlelit vigil at Caskieberran Road, the location of Styx where Allan was last seen. However, Allan’s father, Allan Snr, once again took the opportunity to criticise the earlier police investigation, before stating that he had every faith in the current set-up to establish what has happened to his son. “The police were a joke since day one,” he said. “But now we have new faces. “I believe they have to go back and re-evaluate everyone who has made a statement. The answer is there in the police files.”

Motoring news

Join the queue for littlest Audi Q

November 9 2016

Audi’s relentless release of new models continues with the launch of its smallest SUV. The Q2 goes on sale in the UK next week with prices starting at £22,380. There’s an extensive selection of petrol and diesel power trains as well as the option of front or Quattro four-wheel drive. More models will be added to the range later on, including powerful SQ2 and RSQ2 versions. Aimed squarely at a younger audience, the Q2 has bolder, sharper lines and a different shape to Audi’s bigger SUVs, the Q3, Q5 and Q7. Although it’s clearly meant more for buzzing around cities than growling across farmland, cladding and skid plates lend it an aura of ruggedness. Audi is also offering a range of vibrant colours to deepen the Q2’s appeal to youthful buyers. The interior is as plush as you’d expect from Audi, justifying its price hike over similarly sized SUVs like the Nissan Juke and Honda HR-V. The materials are high quality – softtouch plastics, leather on higher spec cars and brushed aluminium trim elements all blended into a smart-looking package. As standard, drivers get a seven-inch infotainment screen on top of the dashboard. It’s operated through Audi’s rotary dial system that’s far more intuitive and easier to use when on the move than rivals’ touchscreen systems. Among the many options is Audi’s excellent Virtual Cockpit - a 12.3in screen that replaces the manual instruments behind the steering wheel. Overall, the Q2 is 4.7in shorter than the A3 hatchback, but Audi says there’s enough leg and headroom for two adult passengers in the back. Boot space comes in at 405 litres – 50 more than you’ll find in the A3 hatchback and rival Nissan Juke, although it trails the Mini Countryman by the same amount. To begin with, the only diesel option is a 1.6 litre with 114bhp, although a more powerful 184bhp 2.0 litre unit will be added to the range soon. Similarly, the petrol engine range is limited for now but will be expanded by the end of the year. The 1.4 litre, 148bhp unit offered now will be joined by 1.0 litre, 114bhp three cylinder turbo and 2.0 litre, 187bhp options – the latter coming with an S-Tronic automatic gearbox. When it arrives the 1.0 litre petrol version will be the cheapest model in the range with a price tag of £20,230. Courier Motoring has yet to get its hands on the car but early reviews have been very positive and Audi looks to have yet another winner on its hands. jmckeown@thecourier.co.uk

Road tests

Audi Q2 puts quality over size

March 21 2018

Audi’s Q2 was one of the first premium compact SUVs on the market. It sits below the Q3, Q5 and the gigantic, seven seat Q7 in Audi’s ever growing range. Although it’s about the same size as the Nissan Juke or Volkswagen T-Roc, its price is comparable with the much larger Nissan X-Trail or Volkswagen Tiguan. Even a basic Q2 will set you back more than £21,000 and top whack is £38,000. Then there’s the options list which is extensive to say the least. My 2.0 automatic diesel Quattro S Line model had a base price of £30,745 but tipped the scales at just over £40,000 once a plethora of additions were totted up. Size isn’t everything, however. In recent years there’s been a trend of buyers wanting a car that’s of premium quality but compact enough to zip around town. It may be a step down in size but the Q2 doesn’t feel any less classy than the rest of Audi’s SUV range. The interior looks great and is user friendly in a way that more mainstream manufacturers have never been able to match. The simple rotary dial and shortcut buttons easily trounce touchscreen systems, making it a cinch to skim through the screen’s menus. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4eQ5p5Z7-Ek&list=PLUEXizskBf1nbeiD_LqfXXsKooLOsItB0 There’s a surprising amount of internal space too. I took three large adults from Dundee to Stirling and no one complained about feeling cramped. As long as you don’t have a tall passenger behind a tall driver you can easily fit four adults. At 405 litres the boot’s big too – that’s 50 litres more than a Nissan Juke can muster. Buyers can pick from 1.0 and 1.4 litre petrol engines or 1.6 and 2.0 litre TDIs. Most Q2s are front wheel drive but Audi’s Quattro system is standard on the 2.0 diesel, as is a seven-speed S Tronic gear box. On the road there’s a clear difference between this and SUVs by manufacturers like Nissan, Seat and Ford. Ride quality, while firm, is tremendously smooth. Refinement is excellent too, with road and tyre noise kept out of the cabin. It sits lower than the Q3 or Q5 and this improves handling, lending the Q2 an almost go-kart feel. On a trip out to Auchterhouse, with plenty of snow still on the ground, I was appreciative of the four-wheel drive as well. The Q2 is expensive – though there are some good finance deals out there – but you get what you pay for. Few cars this small feel as good as the Q2 does. Price: £30,745 0-62mph: 8.1 seconds Top speed: 131mph Economy: 58.9mpg CO2 emissions: 125g/km

Readers' letters

Dundee Airport comments “misguided”

February 24 2015

Sir, I was surprised and disappointed to read the misguided and irresponsible comments of prominent businessman and current President of Dundee and Angus Chamber of Commerce, Tim Allan, regarding Dundee Airport (February 20). I am the founding President of Dundee and Angus Chamber and our declared policy and philosophy was to represent all businesses in the area and promote the best economic environment in which the universities and businesses of all types could flourish. It is extremely well recorded in many studies that transport links are key to any area’s economic development prospects and airport links are critical in this regard. It is true that Stansted is not the best airport to serve London and I would support Mr Allan’s view about continuing to press for better rail links from Dundee to Edinburgh airport but not at the expense of this local facility. Mr Allan should remember that Stansted, as a hub, serves more than 100 destinations mainly into Europe including all the main European countries which, from a business exporting perspective, is very important to many businesses and to the economic prospects for this region. I would also point out that Tayside Aviation based at Dundee Airport is a hugely important organisation for this area, training pilots for the RAF and for commercial organisations such as Loganair. The importance of a working commercial airport to Tayside Aviation should not be lost. It is true that smaller aircraft which use Dundee Airport are more expensive to run, so the ticket price is never going to match Easy Jet from Edinburgh but when an executive’s time is costed into the three- hour round trip from Dundee to Edinburgh departure gate, Mr Allan may find there are little savings to be made. Of course, as Mr Allan does not live in Dundee or Angus but resides in Clackmannanshire, it is easier and quicker for him to travel to Edinburgh airport. He should remember that as President of the Dundee and Angus Chamber of Commerce he has a duty of care to the wider business community to be responsible in his public opinions. Gary Langlands. Past President, Dundee & Angus Chamber of Commerce. Safeguards for themselves Sir, Following the MPs’ expenses scandal the political rhetoric we hear now about a mansion tax should be treated with contempt, apathy and indifference. The reason I say that is because we all know that the politicians of today will devise any such tax in a way that will safeguard them-selves and future elected members, by some means or other. Every day we see instances whereby those who can put anything and everything on expenses claims forms and charge it to the taxpayers. So should we be surprised, if a mansion tax was brought in, to find that MPs, MSPs and MEPs who are, or became, eligible to pay such a tax on large £2 million properties, simply put it into their respective expenses claims offices and get the money back? When we see a culture that allows those who can to claim for everything from attending funerals to the milk in their tea, no we shouldn’t be. Nothing surprises me now. Colin Cookson. Glenrothes. No solution, but part of future Sir, One of your correspondents complains about the planning process for wind turbines (February 19) and then goes on to say that turbines are loathed. I agree that the planning process is not working satisfactorily and that we should protect the wild areas of Scotland. However, this is not the same as saying that all wind turbines are inefficient, expensive and loathsome. It appears that companies like Michelin in Dundee regard wind turbines as a helpful way to reduce their energy costs. Wind turbines are not the solution to all Scotland’s energy needs and never will be but they are part of the renewable future. It is true that there are subsidies for renewable energy but this is not just in relation to wind turbines. There are also subsidies for solar and biomass and no energy company was willing to build a nuclear power plant in England unless the UK Government guaranteed a minimum price for their outputs. Robert Potter. Menzieshill Road, Dundee. When it fails its own children . . . Sir, The Department of Work and Pensions last week withdrew the disability living allowance from an eight-year-old girl in Lancashire. She is blind, deaf, mute and has a rare life-limiting neurological disorder (BVVL). In my city a group of shameless Tory Party supporters canvass to be re-elected so that they can continue dishing out even more cruel punishments to those who cannot defend themselves. When a government neglects and fails its own children then it is time for a change. Kenneth Bruce. 21 Wallace Crescent, Perth. What about the ones who paid? Sir, With reference to your recent article Legislation to end poll tax collection (February 20), the legislation passed by the SNP Government, writing off the £425 million pounds of unpaid tax, is unacceptable. Surely the SNP Government should now pass legislation to the effect that all those who paid the tax should be reimbursed in full? Roy Moffat. Gilmerton, Crieff.

Motoring news

Form an orderly Q for Audi SUV

August 10 2016

First there was the Q7. Then the Q5 and Q3. All have been a phenomenal success for Audi. I’d be surprised if that script changes when the Q2 arrives in November. Audi’s baby SUV is available to order now with prices starting at £22,380. Can’t quite stretch to that? Don’t worry, an entry level three-cylinder 1.0 litre version will be available later this year with a cover tag of £20,230. From launch, there are three trim levels available for the Q2 called SE, Sport and S Line. The range-topping Edition #1 model will be available to order from next month priced from £31,170. While the entry-level 113bhp 1.0-litre unit isn’t available right away, engines you can order now include a 113bhp 1.6-litre diesel and 148bhp 1.4-litre petrol unit, both with manual or S tronic automatic transmissions. Also joining the Q2 line-up from September is the 2.0-litre TDI diesel with 148bhp or 187bhp. This unit comes with optional Quattro all-wheel drive. A 2.0 litre petrol with Quattro and S tronic joins the range next year. Standard equipment for the new Audi Q2 includes a multimedia infotainment system with rotary/push-button controls, supported with sat-nav. Audi’s smartphone-friendly interface, 16in alloy wheels, Bluetooth connectivity and heated and electric mirrors are all also standard for the Audi. Along with the optional Audi virtual cockpit and the head-up display, the driver assistance systems for the Audi Q2 also come from the larger Audi models – including the Audi pre sense front with pedestrian recognition that is standard. The system recognises critical situations with other vehicles as well as pedestrians crossing in front of the vehicle, and if necessary it can initiate hard braking – to a standstill at low speeds. Other systems in the line-up include adaptive cruise control with Stop & Go function, traffic jam assist, the lane-departure warning system Audi side assist, the lane-keeping assistant Audi active lane assist, traffic sign recognition and rear cross-traffic assist.

Readers' letters

Would UK keep paying Scottish pensions?

May 31 2014

Sir, There is no doubt that Scotland has an ageing population. Correspondent Stuart Allan (letters, May 19) wrote suggesting that I’m trying “to frighten Scots into voting ‘no’.” In fact, I suggested a viable solution to our dilemma. I suggested that existing pensioners should follow a policy of insisting that any future UK government should continue to pay our pensions. In 1964, our mothers produced 104,000 babies. Last year (2013) Scottish births were 56,000. Eventually, those 56,000 are going to have to support pensioners born in the 1960s. A lot of those 1960s children have migrated out of Scotland. Even so, our pensioner proportion is larger and growing much faster than the UK. We must find new tax revenues. One way would be to increase our taxes to, say, Norwegian levels. Basic income taxes are 28% in Norway and VAT is 25% on everything. Much higher than our current rates and not an acceptable solution. But Mr J C Brown (letters, May 24) claims UK taxpayers will agree to fund our pensioners, so he’ll vote “yes” with confidence. Other “yes” voters, say there is yet another way. Scotland could increase both jobs and inward migration levels. The Yes argument is that an annual increase of 25,000 extra immigrants is do-able. While that annual inward migration would solve our pension problem, it would also need a massive investment in new housing and public services too. The Yes campaign says that, free from the UK, we could borrow and invest to create the jobs those migrants would fill. Taxes the immigrants would pay would pay the pensions of Scotland’s growing army of pensioners. There’s a small matter of the EU’s rules about borrowing that Greeks and Spaniards could tell us about. So I agree with Mr Brown of Glenrothes: obliging Wales, Northern Ireland and England to pay our pensions is a neat idea. But will they agree? That is the question. Andrew Dundas. 34 Ross Avenue, Perth. No reason to find it offensive Sir, Contrary to what George K McMillan (May 20) asserts and finds offensive, Allan MacDougall’s letter (May 17) does not, in my opinion, divide “those saying ‘no’ to independence into two extreme categories: rogues, and stick-in-the-muds.” Mr MacDougall’s letter identifies these two groups and concentrates on the latter group but it does not follow that these two groups constitute the totality of the “no” supporters. Moreover, even if Mr McMillan had accurately interpreted Mr MacDougall’s letter, he has no good reason to find it offensive. In such circumstances, he could criticise its analysis as crude and inaccurate (and I would agree) but to brand it offensive is to try to limit debate and discourage free speech at a time when it is particularly important. As a frequent letter writer, Mr McMillan has often made uncomplimentary and denigrating statements about others. He should be one of the last people to find the letters you publish offensive. Gordon Dilworth. 20 Baledmund Road, Moulin, Pitlochry. Excellent series in The Courier Sir, Well done The Courier for the excellent “What If” series last week, a thoroughly in-depth and impartial look at the consequences of independence. The item on electricity bills, something we all have to pay, was of particular interest. The Scottish Government’s pursuit of renewable energy targets by means of massive subsidies must inevitably mean more expensive energy in Scotland. However, the assurance that the rest of the UK will buy that overpriced energy has a hollow ring considering the current Scottish Government supply contract is with EDF, a French company and also Europe’s largest generator of nuclear energy which presumably enables them to keep prices low. Never mind though, we can all save money by turning off a few lights and pulling on another sweater. Mark Liddiard. North Mains, Strathallan, Auchterarder. Just extreme Thatcherites Sir, The victory of Ukip down south is yet another reason for voting yes in the referendum. Ukip have been helped by a wave of anti-immigration sentiment whipped up by downmarket tabloids in England. The only subject Nigel Farage ever talks about is immigration. Ukip’s other policies are hidden. They want to bring in an American-style health system where only those who can afford it get treatment. They support the imposition of a flat tax whereby millionaires pay the same as those on the minimum wage. Ukip want to restrict the right-to-strike, abolish maternity leave, environmental regulations and the Scottish Parliament. They support austerity and have called for a further £77 billion in cuts over those already being enacted by the coalition. Ukip are not a new phenomenon. They are extreme adherents of Thatcher’s ideology that so devastated Scotland in the past. Alan Hinnrichs. 2 Gillespie Terrace, Dundee. Figure doesn’t ring true Sir, I was astonished to hear that the SNP have quoted the sum of £250 million to set up a new parliament (read new constitution and country) when it cost the Scottish taxpayer more than £400 million just to build one building (which, by the way, is now costing so much to maintain, they are thinking of starting again!) Eva Muller-Allan. Todburn House, Earlsferry.

Motoring news

Audi showcases raft of new cars

June 29 2016

Audi threw everything it had at the Goodwood Festival of Speed last weekend, with no fewer than nine upcoming models making their UK debuts. One of the most interesting – and affordable – was the new Q2. Audi’s smallest crossover yet, it’ll sit underneath the Q3, Q5 and big ole Q7. It will be available as a front wheel drive or with Audi’s Quattro four-wheel drive system. Under the skin there’s a choice of three TFSI petrol and three TDI diesels, with Audi’s 1.0 litre three-cylinder petrol offering 114bhp, the 1.4 litre four-cylinder sitting below the 187bhp 2,.0 litre TFSI. Diesel options are the 1.6 litre TDI with 114bhp and a pair of 2.0 litre TDIs with 148bhp or 187bhp. It goes on sale later this summer with a starting price expected to be in the region of £20,000. At the other end of the price scale is the R8 V10 Spyder. The 553bhp supercar comes a year after the second generation coupe R8 was released. Audi reckons the new Spyder is 50 per cent stiffer than the last Spyder, and its canvas roof stows beneath a massive rear deck, able to open or close at speeds up to 31mph in 20 seconds. Fuel economy “improves” to just over 24mpg thanks to a new coasting function that idles the engine when it’s not needed. Expect it to cost around £130,000. In between those two extremes are a plethora of other upcoming Audis, including the new S5 Coupe, and the Audi TT RS which first revealed a year ago is hardly new but apparently it had never been seen in the UK before. A couple of Q7s were also at Goodwood, including the Q7 e-tron plug-in hybrid, which returns a claimed 156mpg, and the SQ7 – a diesel with 429bhp. There was also the refreshed A3 range. Audi’s upmarket Golf rival has been given a styling refresh along with a few new engine options. Following a trend for downsizing, there’s a 1.0 litre three -cylinder petrol unit, while a powerful 2.0 petrol engine also joins the range.

Golf

Scott battles hard at windy West Kilbride

April 5 2010

Ewan Scott has already claimed one of the world's most prestigious junior titles at his first attempt, but the youngster from St Andrews had to dig deep to stay in his own national championship at a wet and windy West Kilbride on Monday. The Madras College pupil, already a scratch player at 14 and rated as one of the best young prospects to come out of the Home of Golf for decades, became the first Scot to win the Reid Trophy the English championship for under-14s at the Kendleshire near Bristol last August. However at the Scottish Boys Championship he found himself in a battle royal with Martin Scott, a three-handicapper from Hamilton who seemed to have the better of the tie standing at two up with six to play. Scott fought back to win the next two holes but saw his opponent drain a 35-foot birdie putt on the 16th, only for the Lanarkshire county player to miss a six-footer on the next to set up real drama on the final hole. Martin was 10 feet inside Ewan in two on the home green but the St Andrian sank his birdie putt from 30 feet only for Martin to follow him in from 20 to keep the match tied. Finally Ewan's greater power won him the tie on the second extra hole, driving the green and two-putting for birdie to secure the win. "It was much tougher than I expected or planned, but I didn't play my best today and hopefully that's my bad game out of the way this week,'' said Ewan. Playing on the links at St Andrews and also a member at the Duke's, Ewan's victory in England last year was a big signal that he's set for a big future in the game. "I just saw it as being a big tournament with the top juniors in Britain if not Europe and that's the kind of competition I want to play in, so to win was a big thrill,'' he said.ObstacleEwan was runner-up in the Scottish Under-14s and third in the Under-16s, and his hopes of moving on this year face a pretty big obstacle in fellow National Academy member Paul McPhee in the second round. Even if Ewan doesn't progress beyond the fourth round he reached at Royal Aberdeen last year, such is his early development that he has another four shots at this championship yet to come. McPhee, the son of former Dundee United and Forfar full-back Ian, is on his last opportunity and won a tight 2 and 1 victory over Kyle Reid of Elderslie. The top quarter of the draw saw further success for Fife with the New Club's Josh Jamieson, Calum McKay (Scotscraig) and Craig Wilson (Pitreavie) coming through their opening matches, while McPhee was joined in the second round by fellow Perth and Kinross players Sean Gatsby (Crieff), Charlie Linton (Dunblane New), Bradley Neil (Blairgowrie) and Stephen Harrower (Kinross). Monifieth duo Grant Bowman and Scott Smith also moved through, Bowman requiring the full 18 holes before besting Fergus Smith of Paisley while Smith swept aside Jason Duncan (Newmachar) 4 and 3. There were no real surprises on the first day with the first three nominal seeds (there are no official seedings in the boys') all coming through. Reigning strokeplay champion Jack McDonald moved through 6 and 4 against Jordan Shaw (Kingussie), championship backmarker Conor O'Neil of Pollok had some struggles to shake off late entrant Cameron Cunningham 4 and 2, the Royal Mussleburgh player having come in to replace John Henry, the brother of two-time champion Scott. The toughest test came for Jack Scott from Deeside, who had to battle all the way before winning one up against Callum Gorrie from Kilmarnock Barassie. Round One A Young (Garmouth and Kingston) bt C McBride (Peebles) 5 and 4N Clenaghan (Mount Ellen) bt R Boyle (Bathgate) 4 and 3W Kerr (Craigmillar Park) bt S Moore (Greenock Whinhill) 3 and 2P Gordon (Paisley) bt M Anderson (Douglas Park) 4 and 3E Mackay (Craigielaw) bt C MacLean (West Kilbride) 4 and 2J McDonald (Kilmarnock Barassie) bt J Shaw (Kingussie) 6 and 4S Harrower (Kinross) bt C Burgess (Musselburgh) 5 and 4B Neil (Blairgowrie) bt R O'Connor (Uphall) 1 holeC Wilson (Pitreavie) bt G Miller (Bathgate) 5 and 4S Hall (East Renfrewshire) bt R Jack (Dumfries and Galloway) 1 holeJ Gallagher (Crow Wood) bt L Pacitti (Sandyhills) 2 and 1C Linton (Dunblane New) bt L alliday (Cardross) 6 and 5P McPhee (King James VI) bt K Reid (Elderslie) 2 and 1E Scott (St Andrews) bt M Scott (Hamilton) at 20thR Hislop (Pines) bt A Loch (Pumpherston) 2 holesB MacDonald (Torrance House) bt J Manson (Oldmeldrum) 2 and 1A Blaney (Liberton) bt J Bryce (Strathaven) 4 and 3S Gadsby (Crieff) bt R Calladine (Dunaverty) 5 and 3M Smith (Troon Welbeck) bt J Innes (Kirkcudbright) 6 and 5K Mustard (Elgin) bt P Timmons (Troon St Meddans) at 19thJ Jamieson (St Andrews New) bt I McDowall (East Kilbride) 4 and 2G Forsyth (Inverness) bt G Caldwell (Inverness) 1 holeJ Scott (East Renfrewshire) bt S Thorburn (Ayr Belleisle) 5 and 4G Roger (Clober) bt P Green (Forres) 1 hole.G Foley (Ralston) bt C Scott (Duddingston) 7 and 5S Gray (West Lothian) bt R Di Murro (Greenock) 3 and 2J Reid (Mount Ellen) bt L Campbell (Baberton) 4 and 2G Bowman (Monifieth) bt F Smith (Paisley) 1 holeG Smail (Craigielaw) bt C Boyd (Lanark) at the 19thS Watt (Old Course Ranfurly) bt C Lamb (Newmachar) 2 holesC O'Neil (Pollok) bt C Cunningham (Royal Musselburgh) 4 and 2E Bradley (Mount Ellen) bt G Balfour (Douglas Park) 4 and 3J Scott (Deeside) bt C Gorrie (Kilmarnock Barassie) 1 holeA McDougall (Elderslie) bt C Norman (Dullatur) 2 holesR Campbell (Grangemouth) bt A McMillan (Easter Moffat) at 22ndG Nicoll (Glenbervie) bt J Wright (Forres) 2 and 1S Smith (Monifieth) bt J Duncan (Newmachar) 4 and 3C Kirkwood (Bearsden) bt R Simpson (Bonnyton) 2 and 1C Forbes (Carnwath) bt G Barrowman (Clydebank and District) 3 and 2L Gaughan (Bathgate) bt R Storrier (Downfield) 1 holeA Carrick (Douglas Park) bt S Smith (Deeside) 2 and 1R Wilkie (Greenock) bt G Young (Williamwood) at 19thG Chalmers (Dollar) bt J Milne (Elgin) 3 and 2P Sangster (Thurso) bt L Morgan (Newbattle) at 19thG Ritchie (Troon Welbeck) bt E Robertson (Inchmarlo) 3 and 2E Douglas (Dunblane New) bt J Reid (Drumpellier) 3 and 2C Cromar (Aboyne) bt T Dingwall (Nairn Dunbar) 2 and 1S Costello (Kirkhill) bt M Manson (Fortrose and Rosemarkie) 1 holeA Borg (Penwortham) bt B Todd (Greenburn) 4 and 3A Tillie (Grangemouth) bt J Thorburn (Dunfermline) 4 and 2M Giovannetti (Douglas Park) bt G Paterson (Ranfurly Castle) 2 and 1F Thain (West Linton) bt G Dunsmore (Saline) 2 holesD Docherty (Bonnyton) bt J Savage (Cawder) 2 holesC McKay (Grange) bt A Collier (Balbirnie Park) at 19thN McArthur (Bishopbriggs) bt R Beattie (Hawick) 3 and 1L Johnston (Dumfries and County) bt A Ferguson (Paisley) 1 holeC West (Scotscraig) bt A McLachlan (Bonnyton) 1 holeL McAlpine (Invergordon) bt D Wright (Cathcart Castle) 9 and 8G Stewart (Crieff) bt L Carruthers (Powfoot) 2 holesG Forrest (Craigielaw) bt C Mitchell (Leven Thistle) 3 and 2F Brown (Nairn Dunbar) bt L Chambers (Cardross) 3 and 1J Williams (Castle Douglas) bt A Whyte (St Andrews New) 3 and 2C Porciani (Ayr Belleisle) bt C McLay (Bishopbriggs) 6 and 5S Burgess (Nairn) bt R McKenzie (Troon Welbeck) 4 and 3C Stewart (Brora) bt G Burns (Williamwood) at 19thR Gillan (Torrance House) bt B Gibson (Troon Welbeck) 5 and 4S Wearing (Bishopbriggs) bt N McGregor (Stirling) 1 holeR Gordon (Alford) bt J Nordbo (Largs) 3 and 2J Burrows (Pitlochry) bt A Carrell (Peterculter) 1 holeA O'Donnell (Greenock Whinhill) bt A Wiseman (Fraserburgh) 4 and 3D Thompsett (Aboyne) bt R Munro (Monifieth) 1 holeI Watson (St Andrews) bt A Easton (Strathmore) 3 and 2R Black (Alness) bt S McPherson (Burntisland Golf House) 3 and 2C Beveridge (Troon Welbeck) bt F Sandison (Blairgowrie) 2 holes

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