120422 Search results for ‘rf/sample/qs/Ferrier Holdings/qt/article_slideshow/qc/tag’

Motoring news

Audi’s new Q cars

April 12 2017

Another week, another new Audi. Two new Audis, in fact. The German car maker has announced a couple more additions to its Q line up of SUVs. The Q4 is a coupe-SUV hybrid that will go up against the BMW X4 and Mercedes GLC Coupe. As its name suggests, it’ll be positioned between the compact Q3 and bigger Q5. At the other end of the scale is the Q8, which will go head to head against the Range Rover. It’s lower and sleeker than the Q7 Audi is also producing. In concept form, it sat only four people, although it seems likely the production version will be a five seater. There’s a 630 litre boot as well. Eagle eyed Audi followers will notice the only SUV slots left to fill are the Q1 and Q6. Watch this space…

Angus & The Mearns

Trousers at the reddy for Nairn Ferrier tribute golf event

May 30 2014

A sporting event will be held on Saturday in memory of a man killed in a North Sea helicopter tragedy five years ago. Angus and Dundee golfers will congregate at Monifieth Links to celebrate the life of Nairn Ferrier, who was one of 16 people killed when a Super Puma helicopter went down off the Aberdeenshire coast in 2009. The helicopter suffered a catastrophic gearbox failure on its way back from BP’s Miller platform. Mr Ferrier’s friend Grant Withers has organised an annual trophy in tribute the largest of which will tee off in the morning. He said: “I am delighted that we will once again have over 50 individuals, made up of both friends and family, golfing at Monifieth this weekend and all turning out in red trousers as Nairn did at his last appearance in the previously named ‘hackers’ golf day. “Now renamed the County Trophy, due to Nairn’s nickname taken from the football team Nairn County, I now find that year-on-year I get requests from new players wanting to participate in the event, either having heard through others or indeed seen us out on the course.” He continued: “In fact the evening element of the day has also become so popular that this year we had members of the club staff asking to work the bar and another friend putting on a complimentary seven-piece band to entertain all.” Three generations of Ferriers played for the first time last year Mr Ferrier’s father, brother Brian and nephew Sam and Brian won. Mr Ferrier was a former pupil of Forthill Primary and Grove Academy. He worked for a time as a mechanic with Mercedes at Camperdown Motors before joining the family business at JAF Carriers and at the Royal Hotel in Monifieth. The father-of-two had celebrated his 40th birthday only a few weeks before the accident.

UK & World

This student took his Tinder profile to the next level by turning it into a PowerPoint presentation

February 21 2018

Standing out from the crowd on Tinder can be tough, but with the help of Microsoft PowerPoint a British student has managed just that – and gone viral in the process.Sam Dixey, a 21-year-old studying at Leeds University, made a six-part slideshow entitled “Why you should swipe right” – using pictures and bullet points to shrewdly persuade potential dates to match with him on the dating app. The slideshow includes discussion of his social life and likes, such as “petting doggos” and “laser tag”, and “other notable qualities and skills” – such as being “not the worst at sex” and “generous when drunk”.It even has reviews mocked up from sources such as “Donald Trump”, “Leonardo Di Capri Sun” and “The Times Guide to Pancakes 2011”.Sam told the Press Association the six-slide presentation only took about 20 minutes to make and “started off as a joke”.However, since being posted to Twitter by fellow Tinder user Gracie Barrow, Sam’s slideshow has been shared tens of thousands of times across social media.So, it’s got the seal of approval form Gracie, but how has the slideshow fared on Tinder? “I’d have to say it has been pretty successful,” Sam said. “Definitely a clear correlation of matches and dates beforehand to afterwards.“Most of the responses tend to revolve around people saying ‘I couldn’t help swipe right 10/10’ but I’ve had some people go the extra mile and message me on Facebook.“Plus some people have recognised me outside, in the library and on dates.”A resounding success.

Dundee

Dundee dealer facing jail for £54,000 cannabis haul

October 1 2015

A cannabis dealer found with £54,000 worth of the drug in a bag in his house has been warned to expect jail. Christopher Ferrie’s home in Dundee was raided on September 11 last year and as soon as officers entered he said: “It’s in that bag in there I’m just holding that for somebody.” Police found 18.9 kilos of cannabis in total mostly divided into 100 gram “slates” for onward distribution. Officers later interviewed Ferrie’s brother who told them he had been “regularly” buying the drug from Ferrie. Depute fiscal Eilidh Robertson told Dundee Sheriff Court that the maximum street value of the cannabis was £54,000, though at the time it was divided up into deals worth a total of £35,910. Ferrie, 32, of Dundee, pleaded guilty on indictment to being concerned in the supply of cannabis. Sheriff Lorna Drummond QC deferred sentence for social work background reports and released Ferrie on bail meantime. She said: “It is an offence that warrants custody. It is highly likely you will be sent to jail for this offence.”

Road tests

Audi Q2 puts quality over size

March 21 2018

Audi’s Q2 was one of the first premium compact SUVs on the market. It sits below the Q3, Q5 and the gigantic, seven seat Q7 in Audi’s ever growing range. Although it’s about the same size as the Nissan Juke or Volkswagen T-Roc, its price is comparable with the much larger Nissan X-Trail or Volkswagen Tiguan. Even a basic Q2 will set you back more than £21,000 and top whack is £38,000. Then there’s the options list which is extensive to say the least. My 2.0 automatic diesel Quattro S Line model had a base price of £30,745 but tipped the scales at just over £40,000 once a plethora of additions were totted up. Size isn’t everything, however. In recent years there’s been a trend of buyers wanting a car that’s of premium quality but compact enough to zip around town. It may be a step down in size but the Q2 doesn’t feel any less classy than the rest of Audi’s SUV range. The interior looks great and is user friendly in a way that more mainstream manufacturers have never been able to match. The simple rotary dial and shortcut buttons easily trounce touchscreen systems, making it a cinch to skim through the screen’s menus. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4eQ5p5Z7-Ek&list=PLUEXizskBf1nbeiD_LqfXXsKooLOsItB0 There’s a surprising amount of internal space too. I took three large adults from Dundee to Stirling and no one complained about feeling cramped. As long as you don’t have a tall passenger behind a tall driver you can easily fit four adults. At 405 litres the boot’s big too – that’s 50 litres more than a Nissan Juke can muster. Buyers can pick from 1.0 and 1.4 litre petrol engines or 1.6 and 2.0 litre TDIs. Most Q2s are front wheel drive but Audi’s Quattro system is standard on the 2.0 diesel, as is a seven-speed S Tronic gear box. On the road there’s a clear difference between this and SUVs by manufacturers like Nissan, Seat and Ford. Ride quality, while firm, is tremendously smooth. Refinement is excellent too, with road and tyre noise kept out of the cabin. It sits lower than the Q3 or Q5 and this improves handling, lending the Q2 an almost go-kart feel. On a trip out to Auchterhouse, with plenty of snow still on the ground, I was appreciative of the four-wheel drive as well. The Q2 is expensive – though there are some good finance deals out there – but you get what you pay for. Few cars this small feel as good as the Q2 does. Price: £30,745 0-62mph: 8.1 seconds Top speed: 131mph Economy: 58.9mpg CO2 emissions: 125g/km

Scottish politics

SNP fury as Scotland Office spending rockets

December 28 2016

The SNP has claimed spending at the “zombie” Scotland Office has rocketed by 20% in four years. Nationalist MP Margaret Ferrier blamed the increase in spending on the recruitment of “an army of spin doctors” to promote the Union. The Rutherglen and Hamilton West member challenged Scottish Secretary David Mundell to explain the rise in spending at a time “Scotland’s budget which pays for public services is being cut so savagely”. A UK Government spokesman dismissed Ms Ferrier’s concerns, arguing it was “right” the department was resourced for the “challenges” of 2017. But Ms Ferrier said: “The Scotland Office has long been a zombie department with next to no responsibilities. And with more powers transferring to the Scottish Government, as David Mundell so enjoys telling us, it would be interesting to hear his explanation for why his department requires such an enormous increase in its budget. “We know that the budget for Mundell’s army of spin doctors and publicity campaigns to promote the benefits of the Union to the people of Scotland has more than doubled. “Perhaps he needs the extra help in trying to devise a believable reason for why he has u-turned on the Single Market and why he believes the people of Scotland should suffer Brexit despite not voting for it. “At a time when households are being told by the Tories to tighten their belts and Scotland’s budget which pays for public services is being cut so savagely to the tune of £2.6 billion by 2019/20, people are entitled to ask just what David Mundell has done to deserve his budget boost and what is he spending it all on?” A UK Government spokesman said: “This year the Scotland Office has ensured the successful passage of the Scotland Act making the Scottish Parliament one of the most powerful devolved Government’s in the world. “It is right we are resourced for the challenges in 2017 as we continue to deliver the remaining powers as well as making sure we get the best deal for Scotland and the whole of the UK as we leave the EU. “The UK Government increased the Scottish Government’s capital budget by £800 million in Novembers Autumn Statement.”

Perth & Kinross

Culinary dimension added to Perth Show

July 28 2016

For more than 150 years Perth Show has been a popular, once a year meeting point for the people of the city and the farming community. The show – now the third largest of its type in Scotland – remains as always a showcase for champion livestock but this year holds a much wider appeal for visitors. To be held on Friday and Saturday August 5 and 6 on the South Inch, throughout the two days, trade stands, sideshows, entertainment, activities, music and parades all add to the vibrancy of the show along with a new culinary direction. “For the first time, Perth Show is set to feature a cookery theatre and food and drink marquee,” said show secretary Neil Forbes. “This will bring a new and popular dimension to the visitor attraction. “Perth Show 2016 is also delighted to welcome Perthshire On A Plate (POAP) – a major food festival, celebrating the very best in local produce and culinary talent. “Organised by Perthshire Chamber of Commerce, the two-day festival will run as part of the show and feature celebrity and local chefs, demonstrations and tastings, book signings, food and drink related trade stands, fun-filled activities for ‘kitchen kids’ and a large dining area and pop-up restaurants in a double celebration of food and farming.” Heading the celebrity chef line-up are television favourite Rosemary Shrager (Friday) and spice king Tony Singh (Saturday), backed by a host of talented local chefs including Graeme Pallister (63 Tay Street) and Grant MacNicol (Fonab Castle). The cookery theatre, supported by Quality Meat Scotland, will also stage a fun cookery challenge between students from Perth College and the ladies of the SWI. A range of pop-up restaurants featuring taster dishes from some of the area’s best known eating places will allow visitors to sample local produce as they relax in the show’s new POAP dining area. “We’re trying to create a wide and varied programme of entertainment,” said Mr Forbes. “Late afternoon on Friday will see the It’s A Knockout  challenge with teams from businesses throughout Perth and Perthshire competing against each other. “And the first day’s programme will end with a beer, wine and spirit festival where teams can celebrate their achievements and visitors can sample a wide range of locally produced drinks.” This year will also see the reintroduction of showjumping at Perth Show on the Saturday afternoon.

Angus & The Mearns

Drink-driver Alistair David Ferrier killed couple

October 21 2010

A disabled driver, close to three times the legal drink-drive limit, killed a Montrose couple as they returned home from a Scottish country dance night in Arbroath. Alistair David Ferrier (30), of St Thomas Crescent, Arbroath, appeared at the High Court in Dundee on Wednesday and admitted causing the fatal accident by driving dangerously. Retired HGV driver John Gibson (69) and his wife Isabella (68) were killed and their lifelong friend Gertrude Massie (71) was critically injured in the accident on December 14, 2008. Ferrier admitted driving dangerously at speed out of Montrose and on to the A92 before losing control close to Upper Dysart Farm by Lunan. His Motability Vauxhall Astra swerved on to the wrong side of the road and smashed into the car driven by Mr Gibson. Advocate depute John Scullion said Ferrier had previous convictions for driving without insurance, driving without a licence, driving while disqualified and speeding. A month before the accident Ferrier underwent residential drug rehabilitation and to keep away from his former associates, he stayed with friends in Montrose after the course was over. He went to the pub with his friends after visiting his mother in Arbroath on the afternoon of the day of the smash. After his first two pints of lager, he handed over his car keys to one of his friends. He went back to the house where he was staying for dinner before returning to the Anchor Bar. Mr Scullion said, “CCTV footage from the bar showed the accused drank a further four pints of lager during the course of the evening.’Drunk'”Some time after 9pm he had an argument and was informed he would not be served any more alcohol as he was drunk.” He went back to the house with one of his friends and while she was making tea in the kitchen, Ferrier took his car key from the table in the living room, where it had been left earlier in the night. His friends thought he had gone to bed, but he had taken the car and was heading in the direction of Arbroath. John Gibson, his wife and their friend had been at the Cafe Project in Arbroath for the Scottish country dancing and were heading back home around 10pm. It was wet, cold and dark, but not freezing, on the road that night as the two cars headed towards a collision. Before leaving Montrose, Ferrier’s driving was causing problems.Too fastMr Scullion said a woman crossing Newbridge was aware of Ferrier’s Astra going too fast and too close to her before overtaking and driving off at speed. A taxi driver and his fare became aware of Ferrier’s accelerating behind them at a speed estimated at about 60-70mph. The accident happened moments later and the taxi driver, who was first on the scene, called the emergency services. Both John Gibson and his wife were pronounced dead after being cut from the wreckage. Gertrude Massie suffered extensive damage to both legs with plates put in by surgeons to hold broken bones. A plate and wires were also used to hold fractures on her left hand. Ferrier himself also had to be cut free and when he was transferred to Ninewells Hospital in Dundee the view of medical staff was that he was unlikely to survive. After a number of operations Ferrier discharged himself from hospital less than six weeks after the accident. Police accident investigators concluded the cars came together around a third of the way into the Montrose-bound lane. More of the Astra was on the wrong side of the road than was in its own lane. Despite extensive damage, the speedometer on Mr Gibson’s car still read 47mph. Debris suggested the Astra had been travelling “at a much higher speed,” Mr Scullion said. A sample of blood taken from Ferrier before his first transfusion gave a reading of not less than 222mgs the legal limit is 80mgs. Ferrier went to Arbroath police station in April last year but told police he had no recollection of events of that day, leading up to, during or after the collision. Mrs Massie continues to have difficulty walking but, more importantly, Mr Scullion said, “She can no longer dance, which is something she misses.” Temporary judge Edward Bowen QC told Ferrier he was required to get background reports and there was little he could say until he had further information and heard from Ferrier’s defence counsel.’Utmost seriousness’However, the judge added, “It will be abundantly obvious to you this is a matter of the utmost seriousness.” He deferred sentence to November 24 at the High Court in Edinburgh and remanded Ferrier in custody. Middle son Kenneth Gibson (49), was at court with his brother Malcolm and sister Shiona with Mrs Massie’s son Ewan. Mr Gibson said his parents and Mrs Massie had been friends for as long as he could remember. He said, “They went dancing every weekend. Life seemed to revolve round that since they retired.” His parents had been to Australia on an eight-week journey once they retired, visiting family and had only returned two weeks before they died. Mr Gibson said when he heard about the accident he was worried his father may have suffered a heart attack and drove up to the scene to see for himself.’Devastation'”There was no way, there was just carnage and devastation. I knew what happened.” He said it had been almost two years of waiting for Wednesday’s court appearance for the family. “We’ve wanted to get it over and done with so we can have closure about mum and dad’s life,” he said. “I am happy he pleaded guilty and glad he got locked up. It just makes it safer for everybody else on the roads.” Gertrude “Gertie” Massie is still suffering the effects of her injuries sustained in the accident two years ago. Mrs Massie, Christie’s Lane, Montrose, sustained two broken legs and a broken wrist when Ferrier’s black Vauxhall Astra coupe smashed headlong into them as they returned home to Montrose on the A92 after a happy night at a ceilidh in Arbroath. She underwent major surgery and was in hospital for three months. Mrs Massie still needs a stick to give her confidence when walking any distance and expects to go back into hospital for a new knee. After a number of operations Ferrier discharged himself from hospital less than six weeks after the accident. Police accident investigators concluded the cars came together around a third of the way into the Montrose-bound lane. More of the Astra was on the wrong side of the road than was in its own lane. Despite extensive damage, the speedometer on Mr Gibson’s car still read 47mph. Debris suggested the Astra had been travelling “at a much higher speed,” Mr Scullion said. A sample of blood taken from Ferrier before his first transfusion gave a reading of not less than 222mgs the legal limit is 80mgs. Ferrier went to Arbroath police station in April last year but told police he had no recollection of events of that day, leading up to, during or after the collision. Mrs Massie continues to have difficulty walking but, more importantly, Mr Scullion said, “She can no longer dance, which is something she misses.” Temporary judge Edward Bowen QC told Ferrier he was required to get background reports and there was little he could say until he had further information and heard from Ferrier’s defence counsel.’Utmost seriousness’However, the judge added, “It will be abundantly obvious to you this is a matter of the utmost seriousness.” He deferred sentence to November 24 at the High Court in Edinburgh and remanded Ferrier in custody. Middle son Kenneth Gibson (49), was at court with his brother Malcolm and sister Shiona with Mrs Massie’s son Ewan. Mr Gibson said his parents and Mrs Massie had been friends for as long as he could remember. He said, “They went dancing every weekend. Life seemed to revolve round that since they retired.” His parents had been to Australia on an eight-week journey once they retired, visiting family and had only returned two weeks before they died. Mr Gibson said when he heard about the accident he was worried his father may have suffered a heart attack and drove up to the scene to see for himself.’Devastation'”There was no way, there was just carnage and devastation. I knew what happened.” He said it had been almost two years of waiting for Wednesday’s court appearance for the family. “We’ve wanted to get it over and done with so we can have closure about mum and dad’s life,” he said. “I am happy he pleaded guilty and glad he got locked up. It just makes it safer for everybody else on the roads.” Gertrude “Gertie” Massie is still suffering the effects of her injuries sustained in the accident two years ago. Mrs Massie, Christie’s Lane, Montrose, sustained two broken legs and a broken wrist when Ferrier’s black Vauxhall Astra coupe smashed headlong into them as they returned home to Montrose on the A92 after a happy night at a ceilidh in Arbroath. She underwent major surgery and was in hospital for three months. Mrs Massie still needs a stick to give her confidence when walking any distance and expects to go back into hospital for a new knee. After a number of operations Ferrier discharged himself from hospital less than six weeks after the accident. Police accident investigators concluded the cars came together around a third of the way into the Montrose-bound lane. More of the Astra was on the wrong side of the road than was in its own lane. Despite extensive damage, the speedometer on Mr Gibson’s car still read 47mph. Debris suggested the Astra had been travelling “at a much higher speed,” Mr Scullion said. A sample of blood taken from Ferrier before his first transfusion gave a reading of not less than 222mgs the legal limit is 80mgs. Ferrier went to Arbroath police station in April last year but told police he had no recollection of events of that day, leading up to, during or after the collision. Mrs Massie continues to have difficulty walking but, more importantly, Mr Scullion said, “She can no longer dance, which is something she misses.” Temporary judge Edward Bowen QC told Ferrier he was required to get background reports and there was little he could say until he had further information and heard from Ferrier’s defence counsel.’Utmost seriousness’However, the judge added, “It will be abundantly obvious to you this is a matter of the utmost seriousness.” He deferred sentence to November 24 at the High Court in Edinburgh and remanded Ferrier in custody. Middle son Kenneth Gibson (49), was at court with his brother Malcolm and sister Shiona with Mrs Massie’s son Ewan. Mr Gibson said his parents and Mrs Massie had been friends for as long as he could remember. He said, “They went dancing every weekend. Life seemed to revolve round that since they retired.” His parents had been to Australia on an eight-week journey once they retired, visiting family and had only returned two weeks before they died. Mr Gibson said when he heard about the accident he was worried his father may have suffered a heart attack and drove up to the scene to see for himself.’Devastation'”There was no way, there was just carnage and devastation. I knew what happened.” He said it had been almost two years of waiting for Wednesday’s court appearance for the family. “We’ve wanted to get it over and done with so we can have closure about mum and dad’s life,” he said. “I am happy he pleaded guilty and glad he got locked up. It just makes it safer for everybody else on the roads.” Gertrude “Gertie” Massie is still suffering the effects of her injuries sustained in the accident two years ago. Mrs Massie, Christie’s Lane, Montrose, sustained two broken legs and a broken wrist when Ferrier’s black Vauxhall Astra coupe smashed headlong into them as they returned home to Montrose on the A92 after a happy night at a ceilidh in Arbroath. She underwent major surgery and was in hospital for three months. Mrs Massie still needs a stick to give her confidence when walking any distance and expects to go back into hospital for a new knee. Mrs Massie said she could remember nothing about the accident that killed her friends. “I remember coming from the dancing in Arbroath. We weren’t doing much talking because, as usual, John and Isobella had music on. “The next thing I woke up in Ninewells. I think I must have broken my wrist putting my hand up as the front seats were pushed back. I must also have banged my head. “I have my own thoughts about John and Isabell. We had been pals for almost 45 years and I miss them. “I also miss the dancing, but I couldn’t manage to go back. I feel thankful to be here.” Mr and Mrs Gibson had celebrated their 49th wedding anniversary just before the accident in December, 2008. Mr Gibson was a retired lorry driver and had been a driver for Taylors Auctions, Montrose, and latterly with a Brechin haulage firm. Mrs Gibson was a shop assistant with W. H. Smith. Many of the mourners who packed the Old and St Andrew’s Church for their funeral were dancers whom the couple had known from events up and down the country. Mrs Massie said she could remember nothing about the accident that killed her friends. “I remember coming from the dancing in Arbroath. We weren’t doing much talking because, as usual, John and Isobella had music on. “The next thing I woke up in Ninewells. I think I must have broken my wrist putting my hand up as the front seats were pushed back. I must also have banged my head. “I have my own thoughts about John and Isabell. We had been pals for almost 45 years and I miss them. “I also miss the dancing, but I couldn’t manage to go back. I feel thankful to be here.” Mr and Mrs Gibson had celebrated their 49th wedding anniversary just before the accident in December, 2008. Mr Gibson was a retired lorry driver and had been a driver for Taylors Auctions, Montrose, and latterly with a Brechin haulage firm. Mrs Gibson was a shop assistant with W. H. Smith. Many of the mourners who packed the Old and St Andrew’s Church for their funeral were dancers whom the couple had known from events up and down the country. Mrs Massie said she could remember nothing about the accident that killed her friends. “I remember coming from the dancing in Arbroath. We weren’t doing much talking because, as usual, John and Isobella had music on. “The next thing I woke up in Ninewells. I think I must have broken my wrist putting my hand up as the front seats were pushed back. I must also have banged my head. “I have my own thoughts about John and Isabell. We had been pals for almost 45 years and I miss them. “I also miss the dancing, but I couldn’t manage to go back. I feel thankful to be here.” Mr and Mrs Gibson had celebrated their 49th wedding anniversary just before the accident in December, 2008. Mr Gibson was a retired lorry driver and had been a driver for Taylors Auctions, Montrose, and latterly with a Brechin haulage firm. Mrs Gibson was a shop assistant with W. H. Smith. Many of the mourners who packed the Old and St Andrew’s Church for their funeral were dancers whom the couple had known from events up and down the country.

Perth & Kinross

Perth Show organisers promise event will be “bigger and better” than ever

July 27 2017

Thousands of people are expected to attend this year’s Perth Show, with its organisers claiming it will be “bigger and better” than ever. The 155th agricultural, equestrian, food and fun extravaganza takes place at Perth’s South Inch on August 4 and 5. More than 1,200 head of livestock will compete in 340 classes while other show supporters will vie for prizes in cooking and handcraft. Trade stands, sideshows, entertainment, activities, music and parades will add to the vibrancy of the annual crowd pleaser. Visitor numbers should be boosted by the announcement that the event has secured a prestigious double by hosting two national cattle shows – the second National Highland Cattle Gathering and the Scottish National Simmental Show. Peter Stewart, chairman of Perth Show, said securing the two national cattle shows in the one year was a “terrific achievement.” “Both will bring business to the city and crowds to Perth Show, with many involved opting to stay locally for the whole weekend,” he said. “The organisers of both these gatherings have chosen the Perth Show because they know we host such events extremely well and we’re delighted to welcome them as a key part of this year’s offering.” The two-day extravaganza will also feature show jumping, champion farriers in action, sheep shearing demonstrations, kids’ activity centres and food and drink. Perth Show’s festival partner Perthshire on a Plate will include celebrity chefs Jean-Christophe Novelli and Nick Nairn, the parade of champions, vintage vehicles, pipe band, pet competition, craft stands, Scottish Women’s Institutes’ showcase competitions and agricultural and commercial trade stands. The programme on August 4 will also include a rare gathering of Scotland’s entire World Championship-winning farrier team with manager, farrier Jim Balfour from Tealing. Meanwhile, the Royal Highland Education Trust (RHET) will offer a range of hands-on activities for children throughout the two days, including a lambing simulator, an oilseed rape press and the ever-popular Daisy – the milking cow. RHET will also host some Scottish beekeepers complete with their live observation hive and craft activities. Show secretary Neil Forbes added: “Perth Show attracts thousands of visitors each year. “This year’s show will continue to feature many of the traditional aspects of agricultural shows, valued by generations of farmers, as well as the new and exciting visitor attractions. “The two-day event promises lots to see and do – whether it be pouring over the latest state-of-the-art agricultural machinery, admiring the finest four-legged competitors, watching a celebrity chef in action, trying your hand on a challenging sideshow, enjoying hospitality at one of the many trade and business stands or stopping for a tasty bite or a brew at the food marquee. “Our two-day festival will draw to a close with the show’s ceilidh in the park’.” He continued: “Perth Show is so much more than just a day out for the farmers. This year’s event is bigger and better than ever.”  

Motoring news

Join the queue for littlest Audi Q

November 9 2016

Audi’s relentless release of new models continues with the launch of its smallest SUV. The Q2 goes on sale in the UK next week with prices starting at £22,380. There’s an extensive selection of petrol and diesel power trains as well as the option of front or Quattro four-wheel drive. More models will be added to the range later on, including powerful SQ2 and RSQ2 versions. Aimed squarely at a younger audience, the Q2 has bolder, sharper lines and a different shape to Audi’s bigger SUVs, the Q3, Q5 and Q7. Although it’s clearly meant more for buzzing around cities than growling across farmland, cladding and skid plates lend it an aura of ruggedness. Audi is also offering a range of vibrant colours to deepen the Q2’s appeal to youthful buyers. The interior is as plush as you’d expect from Audi, justifying its price hike over similarly sized SUVs like the Nissan Juke and Honda HR-V. The materials are high quality – softtouch plastics, leather on higher spec cars and brushed aluminium trim elements all blended into a smart-looking package. As standard, drivers get a seven-inch infotainment screen on top of the dashboard. It’s operated through Audi’s rotary dial system that’s far more intuitive and easier to use when on the move than rivals’ touchscreen systems. Among the many options is Audi’s excellent Virtual Cockpit – a 12.3in screen that replaces the manual instruments behind the steering wheel. Overall, the Q2 is 4.7in shorter than the A3 hatchback, but Audi says there’s enough leg and headroom for two adult passengers in the back. Boot space comes in at 405 litres – 50 more than you’ll find in the A3 hatchback and rival Nissan Juke, although it trails the Mini Countryman by the same amount. To begin with, the only diesel option is a 1.6 litre with 114bhp, although a more powerful 184bhp 2.0 litre unit will be added to the range soon. Similarly, the petrol engine range is limited for now but will be expanded by the end of the year. The 1.4 litre, 148bhp unit offered now will be joined by 1.0 litre, 114bhp three cylinder turbo and 2.0 litre, 187bhp options – the latter coming with an S-Tronic automatic gearbox. When it arrives the 1.0 litre petrol version will be the cheapest model in the range with a price tag of £20,230. Courier Motoring has yet to get its hands on the car but early reviews have been very positive and Audi looks to have yet another winner on its hands. jmckeown@thecourier.co.uk

Breaking

    Cancel