121325 Search results for ‘rf/sample/qs/J.M. Barrie/qt/article_slideshow/qc/tag’

Motoring news

Audi’s new Q cars

April 12 2017

Another week, another new Audi. Two new Audis, in fact. The German car maker has announced a couple more additions to its Q line up of SUVs. The Q4 is a coupe-SUV hybrid that will go up against the BMW X4 and Mercedes GLC Coupe. As its name suggests, it’ll be positioned between the compact Q3 and bigger Q5. At the other end of the scale is the Q8, which will go head to head against the Range Rover. It’s lower and sleeker than the Q7 Audi is also producing. In concept form, it sat only four people, although it seems likely the production version will be a five seater. There’s a 630 litre boot as well. Eagle eyed Audi followers will notice the only SUV slots left to fill are the Q1 and Q6. Watch this space...

News

Anniversary J. M. Barrie shortbread goes global

January 2 2011

Kirriemuir's famous fairytale son has been flying off the shelves in what has become a special first foot gift. As the curtain fell on a year of celebration to mark the 150th anniversary of Sir J. M. Barrie's birth, the figure of Peter Pan helped a commemorative tin of shortbread become a 2010 hit for a leading Scots company with 40,000 sales of the product across the globe. The managing director of Walker's Shortbread hailed the Barrie barrel as one of the family firm's big successes of the year. The international spotlight shone on Kirriemuir throughout the year's Celebration of Imagination which saw everything from book launches to a nod towards Barrie's love of cricket in an anniversary match on The Hill. The first book in the anniversary year was Sir J. M. Barrie of Thrums, written by prolific Scots dance creator Rob Sergant as the companion volume to a new Scottish Reel which is an artistic interpretation of the story of Peter Pan and Wendy. It was Mr Sergant's personal friendship with the shortie firm's joint managing director, Jim Walker, which led to the collectable tin becoming one of the Barrie milestone momentoes. Mr Walker said, "I've known Rob for a long time and he asked me a while back if I realised it was the 150th anniversary of Barrie's birth in 2010. "Rob helped us get all the information which has been put on the tin and it has been a great success." He added, "It was a limited edition and we have done 40,000 which have sold all over the world." In Kirrie the Peter Pan shortie has been a real talking point, according to Wendy Patterson of the town's Star Rock Shop. With the combination of her Christian name and the maiden name of Barrie, the shopowner has been delighted to see her famous namesake keep the town in the global spotlight. "We've had quite a few visitors this year and I would say the Barrie anniversary has definitely helped put Kirrie on the map," said Wendy. "It's a difficult time for shops and businesses, but I would like to thank all of my customers, and this has been something that has gone well."

Books

Writer out to quash Barrie myths

March 5 2011

Kirriemuir has hosted the UK launch of a new book about J. M. Barrie's early literary career that aims to debunk long-standing myths about the author. Professor Ronnie Jack's Myths And The Mythmaker: A Literary Account Of J.M. Barrie's Formative Years went on sale in Angus Fine Arts Gallery, High Street, Kirriemuir, last weekend. Prof Jack, Emeritus Professor of Scottish and Medieval Literature and one of the Barrie experts who came to the town in May for the 150th anniversary of Barrie's birth, spoke briefly about the book and signed copies as requested. Barrie's reputation suffered throughout the 20th century due to limited critical views of him as a sentimental "kailyard" writer, a minor playwright and a "Peter Pan" figure fixated on his mother and the early death of his brother. Prof Jack challenges these myths through an examination of the various literary routes that led to Peter Pan. From Barrie's student notes to his newspaper articles and early plays, Prof Jack reveals how the author's route to fame was carved out in these early "apprentice" years. This apprenticeship, he feels, ultimately led Barrie to find his metier in drama, enabling him to write plays that ranked with the genius of Wilde and Shaw. Myths And The Mythmaker will be available from the publishers Rodopi at the discount price of £43 until March 25.

Road tests

Audi Q2 puts quality over size

March 21 2018

Audi’s Q2 was one of the first premium compact SUVs on the market. It sits below the Q3, Q5 and the gigantic, seven seat Q7 in Audi’s ever growing range. Although it’s about the same size as the Nissan Juke or Volkswagen T-Roc, its price is comparable with the much larger Nissan X-Trail or Volkswagen Tiguan. Even a basic Q2 will set you back more than £21,000 and top whack is £38,000. Then there’s the options list which is extensive to say the least. My 2.0 automatic diesel Quattro S Line model had a base price of £30,745 but tipped the scales at just over £40,000 once a plethora of additions were totted up. Size isn’t everything, however. In recent years there’s been a trend of buyers wanting a car that’s of premium quality but compact enough to zip around town. It may be a step down in size but the Q2 doesn’t feel any less classy than the rest of Audi’s SUV range. The interior looks great and is user friendly in a way that more mainstream manufacturers have never been able to match. The simple rotary dial and shortcut buttons easily trounce touchscreen systems, making it a cinch to skim through the screen’s menus. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4eQ5p5Z7-Ek&list=PLUEXizskBf1nbeiD_LqfXXsKooLOsItB0 There’s a surprising amount of internal space too. I took three large adults from Dundee to Stirling and no one complained about feeling cramped. As long as you don’t have a tall passenger behind a tall driver you can easily fit four adults. At 405 litres the boot’s big too – that’s 50 litres more than a Nissan Juke can muster. Buyers can pick from 1.0 and 1.4 litre petrol engines or 1.6 and 2.0 litre TDIs. Most Q2s are front wheel drive but Audi’s Quattro system is standard on the 2.0 diesel, as is a seven-speed S Tronic gear box. On the road there’s a clear difference between this and SUVs by manufacturers like Nissan, Seat and Ford. Ride quality, while firm, is tremendously smooth. Refinement is excellent too, with road and tyre noise kept out of the cabin. It sits lower than the Q3 or Q5 and this improves handling, lending the Q2 an almost go-kart feel. On a trip out to Auchterhouse, with plenty of snow still on the ground, I was appreciative of the four-wheel drive as well. The Q2 is expensive – though there are some good finance deals out there – but you get what you pay for. Few cars this small feel as good as the Q2 does. Price: £30,745 0-62mph: 8.1 seconds Top speed: 131mph Economy: 58.9mpg CO2 emissions: 125g/km

Golf

Scott battles hard at windy West Kilbride

April 5 2010

Ewan Scott has already claimed one of the world's most prestigious junior titles at his first attempt, but the youngster from St Andrews had to dig deep to stay in his own national championship at a wet and windy West Kilbride on Monday. The Madras College pupil, already a scratch player at 14 and rated as one of the best young prospects to come out of the Home of Golf for decades, became the first Scot to win the Reid Trophy the English championship for under-14s at the Kendleshire near Bristol last August. However at the Scottish Boys Championship he found himself in a battle royal with Martin Scott, a three-handicapper from Hamilton who seemed to have the better of the tie standing at two up with six to play. Scott fought back to win the next two holes but saw his opponent drain a 35-foot birdie putt on the 16th, only for the Lanarkshire county player to miss a six-footer on the next to set up real drama on the final hole. Martin was 10 feet inside Ewan in two on the home green but the St Andrian sank his birdie putt from 30 feet only for Martin to follow him in from 20 to keep the match tied. Finally Ewan's greater power won him the tie on the second extra hole, driving the green and two-putting for birdie to secure the win. "It was much tougher than I expected or planned, but I didn't play my best today and hopefully that's my bad game out of the way this week,'' said Ewan. Playing on the links at St Andrews and also a member at the Duke's, Ewan's victory in England last year was a big signal that he's set for a big future in the game. "I just saw it as being a big tournament with the top juniors in Britain if not Europe and that's the kind of competition I want to play in, so to win was a big thrill,'' he said.ObstacleEwan was runner-up in the Scottish Under-14s and third in the Under-16s, and his hopes of moving on this year face a pretty big obstacle in fellow National Academy member Paul McPhee in the second round. Even if Ewan doesn't progress beyond the fourth round he reached at Royal Aberdeen last year, such is his early development that he has another four shots at this championship yet to come. McPhee, the son of former Dundee United and Forfar full-back Ian, is on his last opportunity and won a tight 2 and 1 victory over Kyle Reid of Elderslie. The top quarter of the draw saw further success for Fife with the New Club's Josh Jamieson, Calum McKay (Scotscraig) and Craig Wilson (Pitreavie) coming through their opening matches, while McPhee was joined in the second round by fellow Perth and Kinross players Sean Gatsby (Crieff), Charlie Linton (Dunblane New), Bradley Neil (Blairgowrie) and Stephen Harrower (Kinross). Monifieth duo Grant Bowman and Scott Smith also moved through, Bowman requiring the full 18 holes before besting Fergus Smith of Paisley while Smith swept aside Jason Duncan (Newmachar) 4 and 3. There were no real surprises on the first day with the first three nominal seeds (there are no official seedings in the boys') all coming through. Reigning strokeplay champion Jack McDonald moved through 6 and 4 against Jordan Shaw (Kingussie), championship backmarker Conor O'Neil of Pollok had some struggles to shake off late entrant Cameron Cunningham 4 and 2, the Royal Mussleburgh player having come in to replace John Henry, the brother of two-time champion Scott. The toughest test came for Jack Scott from Deeside, who had to battle all the way before winning one up against Callum Gorrie from Kilmarnock Barassie. Round One A Young (Garmouth and Kingston) bt C McBride (Peebles) 5 and 4N Clenaghan (Mount Ellen) bt R Boyle (Bathgate) 4 and 3W Kerr (Craigmillar Park) bt S Moore (Greenock Whinhill) 3 and 2P Gordon (Paisley) bt M Anderson (Douglas Park) 4 and 3E Mackay (Craigielaw) bt C MacLean (West Kilbride) 4 and 2J McDonald (Kilmarnock Barassie) bt J Shaw (Kingussie) 6 and 4S Harrower (Kinross) bt C Burgess (Musselburgh) 5 and 4B Neil (Blairgowrie) bt R O'Connor (Uphall) 1 holeC Wilson (Pitreavie) bt G Miller (Bathgate) 5 and 4S Hall (East Renfrewshire) bt R Jack (Dumfries and Galloway) 1 holeJ Gallagher (Crow Wood) bt L Pacitti (Sandyhills) 2 and 1C Linton (Dunblane New) bt L alliday (Cardross) 6 and 5P McPhee (King James VI) bt K Reid (Elderslie) 2 and 1E Scott (St Andrews) bt M Scott (Hamilton) at 20thR Hislop (Pines) bt A Loch (Pumpherston) 2 holesB MacDonald (Torrance House) bt J Manson (Oldmeldrum) 2 and 1A Blaney (Liberton) bt J Bryce (Strathaven) 4 and 3S Gadsby (Crieff) bt R Calladine (Dunaverty) 5 and 3M Smith (Troon Welbeck) bt J Innes (Kirkcudbright) 6 and 5K Mustard (Elgin) bt P Timmons (Troon St Meddans) at 19thJ Jamieson (St Andrews New) bt I McDowall (East Kilbride) 4 and 2G Forsyth (Inverness) bt G Caldwell (Inverness) 1 holeJ Scott (East Renfrewshire) bt S Thorburn (Ayr Belleisle) 5 and 4G Roger (Clober) bt P Green (Forres) 1 hole.G Foley (Ralston) bt C Scott (Duddingston) 7 and 5S Gray (West Lothian) bt R Di Murro (Greenock) 3 and 2J Reid (Mount Ellen) bt L Campbell (Baberton) 4 and 2G Bowman (Monifieth) bt F Smith (Paisley) 1 holeG Smail (Craigielaw) bt C Boyd (Lanark) at the 19thS Watt (Old Course Ranfurly) bt C Lamb (Newmachar) 2 holesC O'Neil (Pollok) bt C Cunningham (Royal Musselburgh) 4 and 2E Bradley (Mount Ellen) bt G Balfour (Douglas Park) 4 and 3J Scott (Deeside) bt C Gorrie (Kilmarnock Barassie) 1 holeA McDougall (Elderslie) bt C Norman (Dullatur) 2 holesR Campbell (Grangemouth) bt A McMillan (Easter Moffat) at 22ndG Nicoll (Glenbervie) bt J Wright (Forres) 2 and 1S Smith (Monifieth) bt J Duncan (Newmachar) 4 and 3C Kirkwood (Bearsden) bt R Simpson (Bonnyton) 2 and 1C Forbes (Carnwath) bt G Barrowman (Clydebank and District) 3 and 2L Gaughan (Bathgate) bt R Storrier (Downfield) 1 holeA Carrick (Douglas Park) bt S Smith (Deeside) 2 and 1R Wilkie (Greenock) bt G Young (Williamwood) at 19thG Chalmers (Dollar) bt J Milne (Elgin) 3 and 2P Sangster (Thurso) bt L Morgan (Newbattle) at 19thG Ritchie (Troon Welbeck) bt E Robertson (Inchmarlo) 3 and 2E Douglas (Dunblane New) bt J Reid (Drumpellier) 3 and 2C Cromar (Aboyne) bt T Dingwall (Nairn Dunbar) 2 and 1S Costello (Kirkhill) bt M Manson (Fortrose and Rosemarkie) 1 holeA Borg (Penwortham) bt B Todd (Greenburn) 4 and 3A Tillie (Grangemouth) bt J Thorburn (Dunfermline) 4 and 2M Giovannetti (Douglas Park) bt G Paterson (Ranfurly Castle) 2 and 1F Thain (West Linton) bt G Dunsmore (Saline) 2 holesD Docherty (Bonnyton) bt J Savage (Cawder) 2 holesC McKay (Grange) bt A Collier (Balbirnie Park) at 19thN McArthur (Bishopbriggs) bt R Beattie (Hawick) 3 and 1L Johnston (Dumfries and County) bt A Ferguson (Paisley) 1 holeC West (Scotscraig) bt A McLachlan (Bonnyton) 1 holeL McAlpine (Invergordon) bt D Wright (Cathcart Castle) 9 and 8G Stewart (Crieff) bt L Carruthers (Powfoot) 2 holesG Forrest (Craigielaw) bt C Mitchell (Leven Thistle) 3 and 2F Brown (Nairn Dunbar) bt L Chambers (Cardross) 3 and 1J Williams (Castle Douglas) bt A Whyte (St Andrews New) 3 and 2C Porciani (Ayr Belleisle) bt C McLay (Bishopbriggs) 6 and 5S Burgess (Nairn) bt R McKenzie (Troon Welbeck) 4 and 3C Stewart (Brora) bt G Burns (Williamwood) at 19thR Gillan (Torrance House) bt B Gibson (Troon Welbeck) 5 and 4S Wearing (Bishopbriggs) bt N McGregor (Stirling) 1 holeR Gordon (Alford) bt J Nordbo (Largs) 3 and 2J Burrows (Pitlochry) bt A Carrell (Peterculter) 1 holeA O'Donnell (Greenock Whinhill) bt A Wiseman (Fraserburgh) 4 and 3D Thompsett (Aboyne) bt R Munro (Monifieth) 1 holeI Watson (St Andrews) bt A Easton (Strathmore) 3 and 2R Black (Alness) bt S McPherson (Burntisland Golf House) 3 and 2C Beveridge (Troon Welbeck) bt F Sandison (Blairgowrie) 2 holes

UK & World

This student took his Tinder profile to the next level by turning it into a PowerPoint presentation

February 21 2018

Standing out from the crowd on Tinder can be tough, but with the help of Microsoft PowerPoint a British student has managed just that – and gone viral in the process.Sam Dixey, a 21-year-old studying at Leeds University, made a six-part slideshow entitled “Why you should swipe right” – using pictures and bullet points to shrewdly persuade potential dates to match with him on the dating app. The slideshow includes discussion of his social life and likes, such as “petting doggos” and “laser tag”, and “other notable qualities and skills” – such as being “not the worst at sex” and “generous when drunk”.It even has reviews mocked up from sources such as “Donald Trump”, “Leonardo Di Capri Sun” and “The Times Guide to Pancakes 2011”.Sam told the Press Association the six-slide presentation only took about 20 minutes to make and “started off as a joke”.However, since being posted to Twitter by fellow Tinder user Gracie Barrow, Sam’s slideshow has been shared tens of thousands of times across social media.So, it’s got the seal of approval form Gracie, but how has the slideshow fared on Tinder? “I’d have to say it has been pretty successful,” Sam said. “Definitely a clear correlation of matches and dates beforehand to afterwards.“Most of the responses tend to revolve around people saying ‘I couldn’t help swipe right 10/10’ but I’ve had some people go the extra mile and message me on Facebook.“Plus some people have recognised me outside, in the library and on dates.”A resounding success.

Readers' letters

July 4: Howff gravestone appeal fell on deaf ears

July 4 2011

Today's letters to The Courier. Howff gravestone appeal fell on deaf earsSir,-One could almost feel the pride throughout J.J. Marshall's column about Morgan Academy, Dundee. What a pity he, and all the other former pupils, are not prepared to do something about the Morgan gravestone in the Howff. Some nine years ago The Nine Trades found it in a disgraceful state. They spent a great deal of money having new pillars cut and the stone repaired and replaced. The stone, however, needs the inscription re-cut. We obtained a quote of some £1300 for the work and committed the sum of £300 to start things off. Despite repeated pleas, often in your paper, for money to make up the balance, we have only had one response, a cheque from one grateful past pupil for £40. So much for the great pride Morgan pupils have in their old school. Work that out at a cost per proud pupil and it is less than a loaf of bread. Some pride. Innes A. Duffus.Dundee.Law Society stayed quietSir,-It must be really demoralising for law students, especially graduates trying to complete their articles and many still seeking employment, to see their profession being further denigrated. I would have thought that, even with its blemishes, the Scottish Law Society would be more than capable of dealing with any criminal case or human rights issue without any outside intervention. Whether politics were involved or not, I remember in 2009 the lord chancellor was one of the main instigators of the Supreme Court. At that time only three High Court judges from Scotland were appointed. With an issue proving so important to our nation, was there even a murmur at any level from the Scottish Law Society? In a constantly changing world perhaps now is the time for a re-appraisal of the Law Society and its role. James M. Fraser.39 High Street,Leven.Pension grumbles overstatedSir,-This morning's editorial (June 29) was spot on when it claimed the public-sector pension issue should have been addressed by the Labour government in 2005 when they memorably funked it. Increased longevity makes impossible continuance of an unreformed system. A 3% increase in contributions and a retirement age of 66 is not the end of the world. The professions tend to overestimate the income they will need in retirement and my kirk pension of £12,000 after 35 years, plus my state pension, has proved fine. My medical brothers received over four times that amount and retirement at 60 but I found the closing years before retirement at just past 65 the most rewarding of my entire career. As long as the poorer-paid public sector workers are protected, I think the better-off professionals with school fees and mortgages long past should keep a grip on reality. (Dr) John Cameron.10 Howard Place,St Andrews. Not the saviours they pretendSir,-The SNP's Alex Orr (June 27) is right to highlight Scotland's marginally better public spending deficit as compared to the UK generally, but at least the Westminster government has acknowledged the need to get it under control. However, the SNP wants to see a Scotland with fiscal policies like slashed corporation tax, significantly reduced fuel duty and tax breaks for favoured sectors such as computer games. The SNP is clearly reluctant to raise income tax or council taxes, or to impose a windfall tax on oil companies. But it makes lavish spending commitments. It surely ill behoves the Nationalists to favourably compare Scotland's deficit to that of the UK. No wonder the SNP is so keen for Scotland to have borrowing powers. Mr Orr highlights the role of oil revenues in an independent Scotland. But this merely underlines yet another future drain on Scotland's public purse, namely the subsidy-hungry renewables industry. There would also be a stealth tax in the form of rocketing energy bills. The SNP's attempts to depict themselves as the planet's environmental saviours, while at the same time portraying oil as the key to Scotland's future, shows that the party wants to have its renewables cake and eat it. Stuart Winton.Hilltown,Dundee. Fairtrade status undermined Sir,-I note with interest your article (June 28) about Scotland being on course to become the world's second Fair Trade nation. Having been on the original working group which helped set up the Scottish Fair Trade Forum back in 2006, I think it would be wonderful to see this goal being achieved. Dundee became a Fairtrade City in March 2004, the first in Scotland, but this status needs to be renewed. That is currently under threat because, unlike other local authorities, Dundee City Council does not automatically provide Fairtrade catering for meetings. It would be a great shame if Scotland's Fair Trade nation accolade were denied because its first Fairtrade city lost its status. Sally Romilly.4 Westwood Terrace,Newport-on-Tay. Leuchars still at riskSir,-The fact that the MoD has spent millions on RAF Leuchars is no guarantee of saviour. Remember that a new hangar complex was built for rescue helicopters of 22 Squadron, only for the RAF to disband the flight. Stephen Pickering.19 Abbey Court,St Andrews.

Readers' letters

August 4: Care standards at Ninewells second to none

August 4 2010

Today our correspondents discuss the standard of care at Ninewells Hospital, bureaucracy in the NHS, John J. Marshall's marshalling of facts and the quality of food at the Apex Hotel in Dundee. Care standards at Ninewells second to none Sir, Your front-page report (July 31) about Mr McLeay and his wife's experiences at Ninewells Hospital, Dundee, must cause concern to those about to require the services of the hospital, especially if their visit can result in a life-changing situation. For this reason, I would like to present another side to the story. I underwent radiotherapy for throat cancer in 2008, which did not solve the problem. In June 2009 I was admitted to Ward 26 for surgery. The staff were at pains to explain what I was in for and I was offered support left, right and centre, support which I personally did not want. I knew I was coming out of theatre without a voice box and that was enough but, never having been hospitalised, that was my concern. Cancer I could handle but what felt to me like incarceration was something else. However, from the minute I left theatre to the time of discharge, I had never been so pampered and fussed over in my life and I won't see 70 again. From the night nurses who brought me tea when I couldn't sleep, to the young student who nagged me incessantly about nebulising, I knew I was being well looked after. As for aftercare and support, that could not be bettered. I have a voice (but cannot sing) thanks to a valve and a therapist. I can smell thanks to the same therapist and I am regularly checked out. To be more logical, does anyone out there know anyone who hasn't slipped up? Garry Stewart.Springbank,Clayholes,By Carnoustie. Free clinicians from paperwork Sir, Mr John Blair, a retired senior consultant at Perth Royal Infirmary, is spot on with his criticism of the over-managed National Health Service (July 30). My own family's experience (two consultants and a doctor) echoes that of Mr Blair, with growing frustration among doctors and nursing staff caused by the empire-building bureaucrats who have shanghaied the National Health Service. Form-filling and box-ticking have taken over from patient care as priorities, while highly trained doctors of long experience have to defer for permission to act to managers with no medical training. Social workers, for instance, have equal status with consultant psychiatrists in decisions whether to section a mental patient or not. If the social worker says no, the patient is released against the wishes of a psychiatrist of long experience. The only way to restore sanity to the NHS is to return to the old regime where doctors and nurses were in charge, with pen-pushers relegated to the secondary role of dealing with the paperwork. Doctors and nurses complain bitterly about the top-heavy management structure, the bureaucracy and the never-ending paper-chase. Why do their organisations not take matters in hand and confront our various governments with an ultimatum - return to a system run by medical staff with a greatly reduced bureaucracy performing a secondary role, or doctors and nurses will opt out of the health service? Next to patients, medical staff are the people who matter. Faced with their opposition, even our benighted leaders would have to give way and dismantle this house of cards. If not, the only part of that title with any meaning will soon be the word national. At the moment, it is an organisation increasingly serving the interests of a bloated and blinkered bureaucracy. Paper has replaced patients at the top of their priority list. Put patients back at the top, with doctors and nurses free to make decisions about their treatment, untrammeled by endless form filling. George K. McMillan.5 Mount Tabor Avenue,Perth. A voice of reason Sir, I am sure that your columnist John J. Marshall would be the first to accept valid opinion or comment as regards his detailed article last Wednesday, but the content of the letter from James Christie (July 31) contained pure party-political bias as opposed to Mr Marshall's facts on the Megrahi case. If it was not for newspaper writers and articles of certain journalists of calibre, the public would be ill informed. Mr Christie did not have to look far for another example of the Scottish Government ignoring public opinion the letter by Ron Greer (also Saturday) on support for Calliachar windfarm. Harry Lawrie.35 Abbots Mill,Kirkcaldy. Casting pearls before swine Sir, One of the best meals (roasted lamb with colcannon) and one of the most memorable breakfasts (lightly smoked Finnan haddock, fresh rocket and a perfect poached egg) I've ever had is when I had occasion to stay in the Apex City Quay Hotel, Dundee. So I was surprised when I recently read an extremely bad review of the hotel in a tabloid. I'm not in the habit of jumping to the defence of large hotel organisations let's face it, they're big enough to look after themselves but I have to say that review was ridiculously unfair. However the management shouldn't get too worried nor should the citizens jump into the Tay yet. The piece was based on the buffet breakfast and written by a sports "pundit". Further research reveals that the reviewer's favourite meal appears to be over-spiced curries and hand-cut chips. He also complains of "the language problem" in the hotel, although it's not made entirely clear who was having the problem. Brian McHugh.52 Kirkwell Road,Cathcart,Glasgow.

News

Cricket match organisers stumped by J. M. Barrie find

August 16 2010

A rare item relating to J. M. Barrie has been unearthed ahead of a sporting celebration of the Peter Pan creator. Next month, the town will turn the clock back when Kirrie Hill cricket square stages a match in the author's honour, and in the lead-up to the event Kirriemuir Heritage Trust is hoping the discovery of a previously unknown Barrie artefact may ring a bell with locals. "Barrie loved the game of cricket, although his writing ability exceeded his sporting talent," said trust official David Orr. "As one of the events to mark the 150th anniversary, a cricket match has been organised to take place on September 5 in the spirit of matches Barrie himself played in. "While researching Barrie's love of cricket and organising the match we have been made aware of a brass hand bell found in the town, which has the sports pavilion on top of it and an inscription relating to J. M. Barrie," added Mr Orr. "The bell was the property of a lady in the town, now deceased, but how she came by it is unknown and the current owner believes that it should remain in Kirrie. "It's assumed it was made for the opening of the sports pavilion on Kirrie Hill on June 7, 1930 when Barrie was also given the freedom of the town but no one has so far been able to give me any more information about it. "I would also think that it wasn't the only bell made, but no one in the trust has seen one before and hopefully the publicity surrounding the cricket match might shed some light on its history," he added.

Books

Book explores J. M. Barrie’s love of cricket

May 15 2010

A book about Peter Pan creator J. M. Barrie's love of cricket has been launched at Kirriemuir library. Journalist Kevin Telfer was writing about Great Ormond St Hospital when he first found out about Barrie's passion for the game. His book, Peter Pan's First XI, tells the story of the Allahakbarries, which featured luminaries such as Arthur Conan Doyle, P. G. Wodehouse, A. A. Milne and Jerome K. Jerome. Kevin Telfer will be undertaking a series of 'meet the author' events. Venues will include Kirriemuir Library, the Camera Obscura, Whatley's Bookshop and the Festival Club at the Thrums Hotel. The latest details of venues, times and further announcements are available at www.barrie2010.org.uk and on the daily 'what's on' posters outside the Gateway to the Glens Museum and Thrums Hotel.

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