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Motoring news

Audi’s new Q cars

April 12 2017

Another week, another new Audi. Two new Audis, in fact. The German car maker has announced a couple more additions to its Q line up of SUVs. The Q4 is a coupe-SUV hybrid that will go up against the BMW X4 and Mercedes GLC Coupe. As its name suggests, it’ll be positioned between the compact Q3 and bigger Q5. At the other end of the scale is the Q8, which will go head to head against the Range Rover. It’s lower and sleeker than the Q7 Audi is also producing. In concept form, it sat only four people, although it seems likely the production version will be a five seater. There’s a 630 litre boot as well. Eagle eyed Audi followers will notice the only SUV slots left to fill are the Q1 and Q6. Watch this space…

Motoring news

Join the queue for littlest Audi Q

November 9 2016

Audi’s relentless release of new models continues with the launch of its smallest SUV. The Q2 goes on sale in the UK next week with prices starting at £22,380. There’s an extensive selection of petrol and diesel power trains as well as the option of front or Quattro four-wheel drive. More models will be added to the range later on, including powerful SQ2 and RSQ2 versions. Aimed squarely at a younger audience, the Q2 has bolder, sharper lines and a different shape to Audi’s bigger SUVs, the Q3, Q5 and Q7. Although it’s clearly meant more for buzzing around cities than growling across farmland, cladding and skid plates lend it an aura of ruggedness. Audi is also offering a range of vibrant colours to deepen the Q2’s appeal to youthful buyers. The interior is as plush as you’d expect from Audi, justifying its price hike over similarly sized SUVs like the Nissan Juke and Honda HR-V. The materials are high quality – softtouch plastics, leather on higher spec cars and brushed aluminium trim elements all blended into a smart-looking package. As standard, drivers get a seven-inch infotainment screen on top of the dashboard. It’s operated through Audi’s rotary dial system that’s far more intuitive and easier to use when on the move than rivals’ touchscreen systems. Among the many options is Audi’s excellent Virtual Cockpit – a 12.3in screen that replaces the manual instruments behind the steering wheel. Overall, the Q2 is 4.7in shorter than the A3 hatchback, but Audi says there’s enough leg and headroom for two adult passengers in the back. Boot space comes in at 405 litres – 50 more than you’ll find in the A3 hatchback and rival Nissan Juke, although it trails the Mini Countryman by the same amount. To begin with, the only diesel option is a 1.6 litre with 114bhp, although a more powerful 184bhp 2.0 litre unit will be added to the range soon. Similarly, the petrol engine range is limited for now but will be expanded by the end of the year. The 1.4 litre, 148bhp unit offered now will be joined by 1.0 litre, 114bhp three cylinder turbo and 2.0 litre, 187bhp options – the latter coming with an S-Tronic automatic gearbox. When it arrives the 1.0 litre petrol version will be the cheapest model in the range with a price tag of £20,230. Courier Motoring has yet to get its hands on the car but early reviews have been very positive and Audi looks to have yet another winner on its hands. jmckeown@thecourier.co.uk

Road tests

Audi Q2 puts quality over size

March 21 2018

Audi’s Q2 was one of the first premium compact SUVs on the market. It sits below the Q3, Q5 and the gigantic, seven seat Q7 in Audi’s ever growing range. Although it’s about the same size as the Nissan Juke or Volkswagen T-Roc, its price is comparable with the much larger Nissan X-Trail or Volkswagen Tiguan. Even a basic Q2 will set you back more than £21,000 and top whack is £38,000. Then there’s the options list which is extensive to say the least. My 2.0 automatic diesel Quattro S Line model had a base price of £30,745 but tipped the scales at just over £40,000 once a plethora of additions were totted up. Size isn’t everything, however. In recent years there’s been a trend of buyers wanting a car that’s of premium quality but compact enough to zip around town. It may be a step down in size but the Q2 doesn’t feel any less classy than the rest of Audi’s SUV range. The interior looks great and is user friendly in a way that more mainstream manufacturers have never been able to match. The simple rotary dial and shortcut buttons easily trounce touchscreen systems, making it a cinch to skim through the screen’s menus. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4eQ5p5Z7-Ek&list=PLUEXizskBf1nbeiD_LqfXXsKooLOsItB0 There’s a surprising amount of internal space too. I took three large adults from Dundee to Stirling and no one complained about feeling cramped. As long as you don’t have a tall passenger behind a tall driver you can easily fit four adults. At 405 litres the boot’s big too – that’s 50 litres more than a Nissan Juke can muster. Buyers can pick from 1.0 and 1.4 litre petrol engines or 1.6 and 2.0 litre TDIs. Most Q2s are front wheel drive but Audi’s Quattro system is standard on the 2.0 diesel, as is a seven-speed S Tronic gear box. On the road there’s a clear difference between this and SUVs by manufacturers like Nissan, Seat and Ford. Ride quality, while firm, is tremendously smooth. Refinement is excellent too, with road and tyre noise kept out of the cabin. It sits lower than the Q3 or Q5 and this improves handling, lending the Q2 an almost go-kart feel. On a trip out to Auchterhouse, with plenty of snow still on the ground, I was appreciative of the four-wheel drive as well. The Q2 is expensive – though there are some good finance deals out there – but you get what you pay for. Few cars this small feel as good as the Q2 does. Price: £30,745 0-62mph: 8.1 seconds Top speed: 131mph Economy: 58.9mpg CO2 emissions: 125g/km

Motoring news

Rising repair costs and whiplash claims behind insurance rise

February 11 2017

Vehicle insurance premiums hit a record high last quarter, rising by more than five times the rate of inflation in 2016. The Association of British Insurers (ABI) said that tax increases, rising repair costs and increasing costs arising from whiplash injury claims were to blame. According to the ABI’s Motor Premium Tracker – which measures the price consumers actually pay for their cover, rather than quotes – the average price for private comprehensive insurance in Q4 2016 was £462. The highest figure recorded before this was in Q2 of 2012, when the average price was £443. The Q4 figure for 2016 was up 4.9% over Q3, equating to a £22 rise in the average premium. It was also found that the average premium for all of 2016 was 9.3% higher than the average premium for 2015. ABI’s assistant director and head of motor and liability, Rob Cummings, said: “These continue to be tough times for honest motorists. They are bearing the brunt of a cocktail of rising costs associated with increasing whiplash-style claims, rising repair bills and a higher rate of insurance premium tax. “While we support the Government’s further reforms to tackle lower-value whiplash costs, it must not give with one hand and take away with the other. The sudden decision to review the discount rate has the potential to turn a drama into a crisis, with a significant cut throwing fuel on the fire in terms of premiums. “Insurers are open to a proper dialogue on how to reform the system and urge the Lord Chancellor to engage with the industry about setting a rate that is fair for both claimants and customers.” Meanwhile, the RAC has released research that suggests not indicating when turning is our number one annoyance on the roads. Well over half (58%) of the survey’s respondents said failing to indicate was the top inconsiderate behaviour. It was narrowly ahead (56%) of those who thought middle lane hogging was the greatest driving sin.

UK & World

This student took his Tinder profile to the next level by turning it into a PowerPoint presentation

February 21 2018

Standing out from the crowd on Tinder can be tough, but with the help of Microsoft PowerPoint a British student has managed just that – and gone viral in the process.Sam Dixey, a 21-year-old studying at Leeds University, made a six-part slideshow entitled “Why you should swipe right” – using pictures and bullet points to shrewdly persuade potential dates to match with him on the dating app. The slideshow includes discussion of his social life and likes, such as “petting doggos” and “laser tag”, and “other notable qualities and skills” – such as being “not the worst at sex” and “generous when drunk”.It even has reviews mocked up from sources such as “Donald Trump”, “Leonardo Di Capri Sun” and “The Times Guide to Pancakes 2011”.Sam told the Press Association the six-slide presentation only took about 20 minutes to make and “started off as a joke”.However, since being posted to Twitter by fellow Tinder user Gracie Barrow, Sam’s slideshow has been shared tens of thousands of times across social media.So, it’s got the seal of approval form Gracie, but how has the slideshow fared on Tinder? “I’d have to say it has been pretty successful,” Sam said. “Definitely a clear correlation of matches and dates beforehand to afterwards.“Most of the responses tend to revolve around people saying ‘I couldn’t help swipe right 10/10’ but I’ve had some people go the extra mile and message me on Facebook.“Plus some people have recognised me outside, in the library and on dates.”A resounding success.

UK & World

Man dies in mini moto crash

September 23 2013

A man has died after crashing while riding a miniature motorbike, police have said. Michael Bailey, 20, from Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, was riding a green mini moto when he hit a metal railing at a recreation ground in the town’s Main Road, at about 1.50pm on Sunday. There were no other vehicles involved. Mini motos are capable of speeds exceeding 25mph and are illegal on British roads.

Angus & The Mearns

Brechin teen revved up to achieve MotoGP ambition

April 26 2013

A teenage Angus motorcycle racer is revving up for an international journey aimed at leading all the way to the top flight of MotoGP. This weekend will see Brechin’s Ryan Watson line up on a packed grid at the Circuit de Cataluyna, north of Barcelona for the opening round of Spanish CEV Moto 3 Championship, a proving ground from which big names including Valentino Rossi, Jorge Lorenzo, Dani Pedrosa and 2013 rookie sensation Marq Marquez have emerged. Ryan (15) started his two-wheeled racing career with Scottish and British mini moto championship domination from the age of just eight, before taking the British crown on a bigger 80cc machine. Since 2011 he has contested the British Superbike Championship’s GP125 category, proving from the off he has the potential to go all the way in the popular branch of motor sport. Ryan’s 2012 performance delivered podium finishes at tracks including Brands Hatch, Oulton Park and Snetterton, with large television audiences enjoying his progress towards a second successive seventh-placed BSB championship finish in a class of almost 40 riders. This season, under the banner of Watson Work Racing, Ryan will be taking to the circuits of Spain for the hotly-contested CEV Moto 3 series, where strength and depth of the field is so impressive that the young riders have to battle it out for the right to even qualify. And the Brechin High pupil is itching to make an instant impression when he puts his saltire-clad knee protector down through the sweeping Catalunya curves. Ryan’s 2013 mount is a Honda NS250R Moto 3, the only one of its kind in Scotland and a quantum leap in power from his 125 bike of last year. “I can’t wait to race on the new bike as it’s absolutely awesome,” said Ryan. “There has been a lot of time and money spent on the bike to get it competitive and my dad and Gordon Work of Brechin have been in the garage every night doing it themselves.” Dad Keith said: “On the big stage Ryan has shown the maturity and understanding required to compete and I’d like to express my gratitude to everyone for their hard work over the past few months to get WWR (Watson Work Racing) to this point. Without them it would never have happened. “We’re very much looking forward to taking on the world and will be flying the flag for Scotland this season,” added Keith, who would welcome contact from any potential sponsor on 07939241152.

Motoring news

Form an orderly Q for Audi SUV

August 10 2016

First there was the Q7. Then the Q5 and Q3. All have been a phenomenal success for Audi. I’d be surprised if that script changes when the Q2 arrives in November. Audi’s baby SUV is available to order now with prices starting at £22,380. Can’t quite stretch to that? Don’t worry, an entry level three-cylinder 1.0 litre version will be available later this year with a cover tag of £20,230. From launch, there are three trim levels available for the Q2 called SE, Sport and S Line. The range-topping Edition #1 model will be available to order from next month priced from £31,170. While the entry-level 113bhp 1.0-litre unit isn’t available right away, engines you can order now include a 113bhp 1.6-litre diesel and 148bhp 1.4-litre petrol unit, both with manual or S tronic automatic transmissions. Also joining the Q2 line-up from September is the 2.0-litre TDI diesel with 148bhp or 187bhp. This unit comes with optional Quattro all-wheel drive. A 2.0 litre petrol with Quattro and S tronic joins the range next year. Standard equipment for the new Audi Q2 includes a multimedia infotainment system with rotary/push-button controls, supported with sat-nav. Audi’s smartphone-friendly interface, 16in alloy wheels, Bluetooth connectivity and heated and electric mirrors are all also standard for the Audi. Along with the optional Audi virtual cockpit and the head-up display, the driver assistance systems for the Audi Q2 also come from the larger Audi models – including the Audi pre sense front with pedestrian recognition that is standard. The system recognises critical situations with other vehicles as well as pedestrians crossing in front of the vehicle, and if necessary it can initiate hard braking – to a standstill at low speeds. Other systems in the line-up include adaptive cruise control with Stop & Go function, traffic jam assist, the lane-departure warning system Audi side assist, the lane-keeping assistant Audi active lane assist, traffic sign recognition and rear cross-traffic assist.

Scottish politics

Plan for Scottish firms to secure workers from EU under Brexit exemption

February 23 2017

Parts of Scotland would have special access to EU workers under a proposal mooted by the Scottish Secretary. David Mundell said the UK Government is “not minded” for immigration to be devolved to Holyrood – a key plank of Nicola Sturgeon’s demands over Brexit. But the Conservative MP suggested geographical areas affected by depopulation and labour shortages will need to have unique arrangements. Rural parts of Tayside and Fife rely on seasonal workers and many are seeing a population decline of younger people. Mr Mundell told MSPs on Wednesday his government was looking at a UK-wide system which protects the supply of EU workers. “Clearly we need to address issues around depopulation and the provision of services in those areas,” he said. “I am not minded to a view that immigration should be devolved. The Scottish Government have clearly made that case. “But going forward we want to have an immigration system that allows for those jobs, which are necessary in our economy, to be filled.” In November, Angus Soft Fruits, which employs 4,000 seasonal workers from the EU, threatened to move abroad if post-Brexit immigration policy stops it from recruiting from the bloc. Scotland voted with a 62% majority to Remain in the EU, but Leave votes elsewhere in the UK threaten to over-rule that. Ms Sturgeon has put forward proposals for Scotland to stay in the European single market while part of a UK that leaves. The First Minister says an independence referendum is “highly likely” if Scotland’s will is ignored. Mr Mundell told journalists after his appearance at Holyrood’s EU committee that the way to attract workers to Scotland is not by making the country the highest taxed part of the UK. Scots earning at least £43,000 will pay up to £400 more a year than their English counterparts after Holyrood set income tax under major new powers on Tuesday. Mr Mundell also said the triggering of Article 50, which starts the two-year Brexit process, is not a deadline to negotiations with the Scottish Government. A Scottish Government spokesman said that goes against assurances previously made by UK ministers. “Our position remains that it is essential UK ministers establish a position that properly reflects all parts of the UK ahead of Article 50 being triggered,” he added.

Plans to extend MOT-free period for new cars scrapped

January 18 2018

Government plans to extend the period before a car’s first MOT have been abandoned over safety fears. The Department for Transport (DfT) held a consultation last year proposing that new cars should be allowed on Britain’s roads for four years before undergoing the test. But most of the responses were against extending the current three-year limit, arguing that it would increase the risk to road users as the test often highlights potential issues affecting vehicles. A public survey commissioned by the DfT found that fewer than half of people were in favour of the change, which would also have applied to motorcycles. Roads Minister Jesse Norman said: “Although modern cars are better built and safer than when the MOT test was last changed 50 years ago, there has been a clear public concern that any further changes don’t put people’s lives at risk.” The DfT estimates its proposals would have saved motorists more than £100 million a year. The maximum fee for a car is £54.85 while a standard motorcycle test is £29.65. Neil Greig, director of policy and research at driving charity IAM RoadSmart, said a “clear majority” of its members supported the status quo. He went on: “Far too many vehicles fail their first MOT on safety-critical items such as tyres and brakes to risk change which might have undermined our world-leading safety record.” Steve Gooding, director of motoring research charity the RAC Foundation, said the MOT test “focuses drivers’ minds” on the state of their vehicles. He believes maintaining the timing of the first test could actually save people money by alerting them to problems before they become “serious, expensive to fix and dangerous to other road users”. In 1967 the MOT-free period was slashed from 10 to three years. Increasing this to four years would have brought Britain into line with Northern Ireland and many other European countries including France, Ireland, Italy, Spain, Denmark and Norway. Motorists can be fined up to £1,000 for driving a vehicle without a valid MOT. Vehicles must undergo the test on the third anniversary of their registration and every 12 months if they are over three years old. It is also a legal requirement that vehicles are roadworthy, regardless of whether they have passed an MOT. A number of vehicle parts are checked during MOTs to ensure they meet legal standards, such as lights, seatbelts, tyres and brakes. Twenty-eight people were killed and 413 were seriously injured in accidents on Britain’s roads in 2016 when a vehicle defect was a contributory factor. (function(i,s,o,g,r,a,m){i['GoogleAnalyticsObject']=r;i[r]=i[r]||function(){ (i[r].q=i[r].q||[]).push(arguments)},i[r].l=1*new Date();a=s.createElement(o), m=s.getElementsByTagName(o)[0];a.async=1;a.src=g;m.parentNode.insertBefore(a,m) })(window,document,'script','//www.google-analytics.com/analytics.js','ga'); ga('create', 'UA-72310761-1', 'auto', {'name': 'pacontentapi'}); ga('pacontentapi.set', 'referrer', location.origin); ga('pacontentapi.set', 'dimension1', 'By Neil Lancefield, Press Association Transport Correspondent'); ga('pacontentapi.set', 'dimension2', '59bc9d8d-82ff-4930-b72a-e2ea95825ea4'); ga('pacontentapi.set', 'dimension3', 'paservice:news,paservice:news:uk'); ga('pacontentapi.set', 'dimension6', 'story'); ga('pacontentapi.set', 'dimension7', 'composite'); ga('pacontentapi.set', 'dimension8', null); ga('pacontentapi.set', 'dimension9', null); ga('pacontentapi.send', 'pageview', { 'location': location.href, 'page': (location.pathname + location.search + location.hash), 'title': 'Plans to extend MOT-free period for new cars scrapped'});

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