105958 Search results for ‘rf/sample/qs/Neil Cumming/qt/article_slideshow/qc/tag’

Motoring news

Audi’s new Q cars

April 12 2017

Another week, another new Audi. Two new Audis, in fact. The German car maker has announced a couple more additions to its Q line up of SUVs. The Q4 is a coupe-SUV hybrid that will go up against the BMW X4 and Mercedes GLC Coupe. As its name suggests, it’ll be positioned between the compact Q3 and bigger Q5. At the other end of the scale is the Q8, which will go head to head against the Range Rover. It’s lower and sleeker than the Q7 Audi is also producing. In concept form, it sat only four people, although it seems likely the production version will be a five seater. There’s a 630 litre boot as well. Eagle eyed Audi followers will notice the only SUV slots left to fill are the Q1 and Q6. Watch this space...

Road tests

Audi Q2 puts quality over size

March 21 2018

Audi’s Q2 was one of the first premium compact SUVs on the market. It sits below the Q3, Q5 and the gigantic, seven seat Q7 in Audi’s ever growing range. Although it’s about the same size as the Nissan Juke or Volkswagen T-Roc, its price is comparable with the much larger Nissan X-Trail or Volkswagen Tiguan. Even a basic Q2 will set you back more than £21,000 and top whack is £38,000. Then there’s the options list which is extensive to say the least. My 2.0 automatic diesel Quattro S Line model had a base price of £30,745 but tipped the scales at just over £40,000 once a plethora of additions were totted up. Size isn’t everything, however. In recent years there’s been a trend of buyers wanting a car that’s of premium quality but compact enough to zip around town. It may be a step down in size but the Q2 doesn’t feel any less classy than the rest of Audi’s SUV range. The interior looks great and is user friendly in a way that more mainstream manufacturers have never been able to match. The simple rotary dial and shortcut buttons easily trounce touchscreen systems, making it a cinch to skim through the screen’s menus. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4eQ5p5Z7-Ek&list=PLUEXizskBf1nbeiD_LqfXXsKooLOsItB0 There’s a surprising amount of internal space too. I took three large adults from Dundee to Stirling and no one complained about feeling cramped. As long as you don’t have a tall passenger behind a tall driver you can easily fit four adults. At 405 litres the boot’s big too – that’s 50 litres more than a Nissan Juke can muster. Buyers can pick from 1.0 and 1.4 litre petrol engines or 1.6 and 2.0 litre TDIs. Most Q2s are front wheel drive but Audi’s Quattro system is standard on the 2.0 diesel, as is a seven-speed S Tronic gear box. On the road there’s a clear difference between this and SUVs by manufacturers like Nissan, Seat and Ford. Ride quality, while firm, is tremendously smooth. Refinement is excellent too, with road and tyre noise kept out of the cabin. It sits lower than the Q3 or Q5 and this improves handling, lending the Q2 an almost go-kart feel. On a trip out to Auchterhouse, with plenty of snow still on the ground, I was appreciative of the four-wheel drive as well. The Q2 is expensive – though there are some good finance deals out there – but you get what you pay for. Few cars this small feel as good as the Q2 does. Price: £30,745 0-62mph: 8.1 seconds Top speed: 131mph Economy: 58.9mpg CO2 emissions: 125g/km

Perth & Kinross

Culinary dimension added to Perth Show

July 28 2016

For more than 150 years Perth Show has been a popular, once a year meeting point for the people of the city and the farming community. The show - now the third largest of its type in Scotland – remains as always a showcase for champion livestock but this year holds a much wider appeal for visitors. To be held on Friday and Saturday August 5 and 6 on the South Inch, throughout the two days, trade stands, sideshows, entertainment, activities, music and parades all add to the vibrancy of the show along with a new culinary direction. “For the first time, Perth Show is set to feature a cookery theatre and food and drink marquee,” said show secretary Neil Forbes. “This will bring a new and popular dimension to the visitor attraction. “Perth Show 2016 is also delighted to welcome Perthshire On A Plate (POAP) - a major food festival, celebrating the very best in local produce and culinary talent. “Organised by Perthshire Chamber of Commerce, the two-day festival will run as part of the show and feature celebrity and local chefs, demonstrations and tastings, book signings, food and drink related trade stands, fun-filled activities for ‘kitchen kids’ and a large dining area and pop-up restaurants in a double celebration of food and farming.” Heading the celebrity chef line-up are television favourite Rosemary Shrager (Friday) and spice king Tony Singh (Saturday), backed by a host of talented local chefs including Graeme Pallister (63 Tay Street) and Grant MacNicol (Fonab Castle). The cookery theatre, supported by Quality Meat Scotland, will also stage a fun cookery challenge between students from Perth College and the ladies of the SWI. A range of pop-up restaurants featuring taster dishes from some of the area’s best known eating places will allow visitors to sample local produce as they relax in the show’s new POAP dining area. “We’re trying to create a wide and varied programme of entertainment,” said Mr Forbes. “Late afternoon on Friday will see the It’s A Knockout  challenge with teams from businesses throughout Perth and Perthshire competing against each other. “And the first day’s programme will end with a beer, wine and spirit festival where teams can celebrate their achievements and visitors can sample a wide range of locally produced drinks.” This year will also see the reintroduction of showjumping at Perth Show on the Saturday afternoon.

Scottish politics

Kezia Dugdale insists Labour ‘really upbeat’ as campaign enters final days

May 3 2016

Labour's Kezia Dugdale insisted she is "immensely proud" of the campaign her party has fought as the race for Holyrood entered its final 48 hours. The Scottish Labour leader said her party is "really upbeat" and "really focused on the final few days of the campaign". She was speaking as she took her campaign, which has focused on using new tax powers coming to Holyrood to raise additional cash for public services, to a softplay centre in Glasgow. Her visit came as another poll put Labour and the Tories neck-and-neck in the fight to be the official opposition. While the SNP are comfortably ahead and expected to win another majority at the Scottish Parliament on Thursday, Ms Dugdale said First Minister Nicola Sturgeon may regret posing with a copy of The Sun newspaper. https://twitter.com/TheAnfieldChat/status/726710543873114113 The paper has been boycotted by some Liverpool fans for its original coverage of the Hillsborough tragedy, in which 96 football fans lost their lives, and an inquest ruled last week they were unlawfully killed. In the same week the Scottish Sun gave its backing to the SNP, with a front page picture showing Ms Sturgeon holding a copy of the paper. Neil Findlay, a former Scottish Labour leadership candidate, tweeted : "To pose like this in the week of the Hillsborough verdict is breath-taking." Ms Dugdale said: "I think given the response there has been on Twitter, she will be regretting it." Labour argues Scotland would be £3 billion better off under its plans, which would see the basic rate of income tax increased by 1p north of the border, while the top rate, for those earning £150,000 a year or more, would go from 45p to 50p. "We've got a simple, honest message that the Labour Party has a plan to stop the cuts," Ms Dugdale said. "We're prepared to use the powers of the Parliament to raise enough money to increase public spending in Scotland. If we choose not to do this we're going to face £3 billion of cuts to come in Scotland." That could see £336 million more spent in Glasgow, according to Labour, with an additional £276 million for Edinburgh and £137 million for Aberdeen. Ms Dugdale said: "I'm immensely proud of the campaign Labour has run because we are the only party that has actually been talking about ideas about Scotland's future, about how to transform the country with the powers the Parliament has, and we've done that by being bold and honest about tax, and asking the richest people in society to pay a bit more tax. "I'm immensely proud of that and I will continue to make that argument well into the future."

This student took his Tinder profile to the next level by turning it into a PowerPoint presentation

February 21 2018

Standing out from the crowd on Tinder can be tough, but with the help of Microsoft PowerPoint a British student has managed just that – and gone viral in the process.Sam Dixey, a 21-year-old studying at Leeds University, made a six-part slideshow entitled “Why you should swipe right” – using pictures and bullet points to shrewdly persuade potential dates to match with him on the dating app. The slideshow includes discussion of his social life and likes, such as “petting doggos” and “laser tag”, and “other notable qualities and skills” – such as being “not the worst at sex” and “generous when drunk”.It even has reviews mocked up from sources such as “Donald Trump”, “Leonardo Di Capri Sun” and “The Times Guide to Pancakes 2011”.Sam told the Press Association the six-slide presentation only took about 20 minutes to make and “started off as a joke”.However, since being posted to Twitter by fellow Tinder user Gracie Barrow, Sam’s slideshow has been shared tens of thousands of times across social media.So, it’s got the seal of approval form Gracie, but how has the slideshow fared on Tinder? “I’d have to say it has been pretty successful,” Sam said. “Definitely a clear correlation of matches and dates beforehand to afterwards.“Most of the responses tend to revolve around people saying ‘I couldn’t help swipe right 10/10’ but I’ve had some people go the extra mile and message me on Facebook.“Plus some people have recognised me outside, in the library and on dates.”A resounding success.

Motoring news

Rising repair costs and whiplash claims behind insurance rise

February 11 2017

Vehicle insurance premiums hit a record high last quarter, rising by more than five times the rate of inflation in 2016. The Association of British Insurers (ABI) said that tax increases, rising repair costs and increasing costs arising from whiplash injury claims were to blame. According to the ABI’s Motor Premium Tracker - which measures the price consumers actually pay for their cover, rather than quotes - the average price for private comprehensive insurance in Q4 2016 was £462. The highest figure recorded before this was in Q2 of 2012, when the average price was £443. The Q4 figure for 2016 was up 4.9% over Q3, equating to a £22 rise in the average premium. It was also found that the average premium for all of 2016 was 9.3% higher than the average premium for 2015. ABI’s assistant director and head of motor and liability, Rob Cummings, said: “These continue to be tough times for honest motorists. They are bearing the brunt of a cocktail of rising costs associated with increasing whiplash-style claims, rising repair bills and a higher rate of insurance premium tax. “While we support the Government’s further reforms to tackle lower-value whiplash costs, it must not give with one hand and take away with the other. The sudden decision to review the discount rate has the potential to turn a drama into a crisis, with a significant cut throwing fuel on the fire in terms of premiums. “Insurers are open to a proper dialogue on how to reform the system and urge the Lord Chancellor to engage with the industry about setting a rate that is fair for both claimants and customers.” Meanwhile, the RAC has released research that suggests not indicating when turning is our number one annoyance on the roads. Well over half (58%) of the survey’s respondents said failing to indicate was the top inconsiderate behaviour. It was narrowly ahead (56%) of those who thought middle lane hogging was the greatest driving sin.

News

Perth paramedic munches eyeballs and pig snouts as bushtucker trial raises £1,000

January 28 2015

A Perth paramedic has munched through pig snouts and eyeballs in a bushtucker trial that raised more than £1,000 for charity. Neil McDonald, 43, polished off the nauseating spread of insects and other unmentionables with a glass of beer to raise money for the Scottish Association for Mental Health. Neil, manager of the Scottish Ambulance Special Operations Response Team in the east of Scotland, has set himself a list of challenges for 2015 to get fit and help raise money for the charity. The veteran T in the Park medic, from Cherrybank, has promised to do a firewalk, a solo cycle round Loch Katrine, a bungee jump off the Tummel Bridge and a swim across Loch Tay. After taking part in Movember and completing the Battersea Park 6k Santa Run, Neil’s third challenge, the firewalk, was cancelled by organisers. However, brave Neil told supporters he would do an I’m a Celebrity-style bustucker trial instead. He said: “I have been completely overwhelmed by the generosity shown, both financially and morally.” To support Neil’s fundraising visit www.justgiving.com/NellyMcD/.

UK & World

Social workers involved in St Helena child abuse inquiry take legal action

March 23 2018

Two social workers who say an inquiry report into allegations of child abuse on the British overseas territory of St Helena destroyed their professional reputations have taken legal action.Claire Gannon and Martin Warsama, who worked on St Helena and made cover-up allegations, have sued the Foreign Office and the senior barrister who led the inquiry.They say they “stand by the accuracy and honesty of their disclosures” and say conclusions were reached on the basis of an inquiry which was procedurally unfair.Lawyers representing ministers and inquiry chairman Sasha Wass QC dispute their claim and say the litigation should not proceed.A judge was on Friday considering issues in the case at a High Court hearing in London.Barrister Neil Sheldon, who is leading a legal team representing Foreign Office ministers, asked the judge, Master Victoria McCloud, to halt the litigation and dismiss the claim launched by Ms Gannon and Mr Warsama.The inquiry had been set up by ministers following corruption and cover-up allegations which had been raised in newspaper articles and leaked documents and made by Ms Gannon and Martin Warsama.An inquiry report published in December 2015 concluded that: St Helena did not “attract sex tourism”; said allegations that the island in the South Atlantic was a “paedophiles’ paradise” were not true; reported “no corruption at all”; and found no evidence of any attempt by the Foreign Office, the Department for International Development, the St Helena government or police to cover up child abuse.The report said: “We stress that there was no ‘cover-up’ as alleged by Ms Gannon and Mr Warsama, rather an ignorance of proper safeguarding procedure.”Nicholas Bowen QC, who represents Ms Gannon and Mr Warsama, told the judge the conclusions of the Wass Inquiry “destroyed” the professional reputations of his clients.He said the inquiry process was “procedurally” unfair and said Ms Gannon and Mr Warsama were entitled to “just satisfaction” for their loss.Ms Gannon and Mr Warsama say their claim should not be dismissed but say evidence should be analysed at a trial.

Politics

Nicola Sturgeon promises ‘credible’ plans in tax credit cuts exchanges

November 5 2015

Nicola Sturgeon has pledged "credible, deliverable and affordable plans" to protect poorer families from tax credit cuts as she criticised Labour's "back-of-a-fag-packet" proposals to ensure no Scots lose out. Scottish Labour leader Kezia Dugdale has already pledged if the Conservatives at Westminster reduce the payments, her party would use new powers coming to Holyrood to fully mitigate these. The First Minister said today her government would act to counter the changes if they are pushed through by Chancellor George Osborne. But she did not give any details on what form this would take or how it would be paid for. Ms Sturgeon came under pressure from Labour on the issue of tax credits at First Minister's Questions at the Scottish Parliament. It comes after Ms Dugdale told the Scottish Labour Party conference that if she becomes First Minister after next year's Scottish elections, she would reverse the cuts for households north of the border. The Scottish Labour leader said this would be paid for using income tax cash from higher earners and by not cutting air passenger duty, as the SNP plans to do. She told Ms Sturgeon: "Across the UK, Labour will fight the Tory government's attempt to cut tax credits. We want George Osborne to scrap his plan altogether. "But if he doesn't, this Parliament must act to protect working families." The SNP leader told her: "Over these next three weeks we intend to keep up the pressure on George Osborne to drop his plans for tax credit cuts. "Unlike Labour - who remember initially abstained in the House of Commons on this issue - the SNP have consistently opposed these cuts." She said if the cuts were not reversed in full "what we will do as a responsible government is bring forward credible, deliverable and affordable plans to protect low-income households, just as we did on the bedroom tax. "I think that, frankly, is a far better plan and it is far fairer for people who are affected by these cuts than back-of-a-fag-packet proposals from a party that knows it has little chance of ever being in a position to implement them." She hit out at Labour, saying that "just when the pressure is building across the UK on George Osborne, they ease up on the Tories and attack the SNP instead". Ms Dugdale told the First Minister that Labour had introduced tax credits asshe pledged the party would “do everything we can to protect them includingusing the powers of this Parliament.” The Labour leader insisted: “No matter what George Osborne does at the autumn statement, Scottish Labour is committed to restoring the money lost through tax credits for working families.” She pressed Ms Sturgeon on the issue the day after Social Justice Secretary Alex Neil told MSPs the Scottish Government will have the power to top up tax credits if they are cut by the UK - but said Holyrood ministers would not reveal their plans until they have been “properly costed”. Ms Dugdale said the 6,000 families in the First Minister’s Glasgow Southside constituency who benefit from the payments “deserve a bit more than a vague assurance from the SNP that the government will act”. She added: “This is the week the SNP’s constitutional games came unstuck, because after years of responding to every problem with complaints about the constitution, Alex Neil finally gave the game away. This was the week the SNP had to admit the new powers heading our way can transform Scotland. “This is the week that the SNP had to confront the fact that difficult choices will have to be made, so will the First Minister now give up the politics of grievance, will she look to the future of what is possible, move on from the past and just get on with delivering a fairer Scotland?” Ms Sturgeon said the SNP would “continue to oppose these cuts at source, unlike Labour who when it came to a vote in the House of Commons abstained”. She added that if the reductions to tax credits go ahead, ministers “will bring forward a credible, workable, deliverable affordable plan to protect low-income households”. The First Minister continued: “The detail of this, to families out there who are affected, really matters. And one of the details that matters most is how this policy would be paid for.” Ms Dugdale has said some of the cash would come from not implementing the SNP’s planned cut in air passenger duty, but the First Minister said in an interview with Holyrood magazine the Labour leader had already pledged to spend that money on education. “In the space of 24 hours Labour managed to spend the same sum of money twice over,” Ms Sturgeon said. “That is basic incompetence and the people of Scotland frankly deserve better. “We’ve known for some time that the public thinks Labour is unelectable, I think what we have found out this week is that Labour thinks Labour is unelectable. It’s less Keir Hardie, more Laurel and Hardy.” Ms Sturgeon, who has urged voters in next May’s Holyrood elections to judge her on her record, added: “There’s one place and one place only where Labour can be judged on their actions and not on their words, and in Wales Labour don’t even mitigate the bedroom tax: that’s the reality of Labour in government.”

Rocktalk

Award-winning Tayside song writer Eddie Cairney immortalises Queensferry Crossing in tune

October 25 2017

An award-winning Tayside song writer who immortalised the 50th anniversary of the Tay Road Bridge in music last year has released an EP which pays tribute to the newly opened Queensferry Crossing over the Forth. Perth-born Eddie Cairney, 65, who now lives in Arbroath, has released an album called ‘Sketches o' the QC’ which includes songs dedicated to the “isolated” workers who were employed during construction and contrasts the old Forth Road Bridge to the new crossing with its wind shields designed to keep traffic flowing during storms. Eddie, who delayed the release of the album due to family illness and bereavement, said: “It's just another quirky album like I did for the Tay Road Bridge. https://youtu.be/Z6BblA_Zev4 “As you can probably imagine, how do you write six songs about a bridge? “I usually end up using a process of creative journalism. I get a few facts or even just a single fact and then I let my imagination take over. “With each album early on in the writing process I draw a blank and think there's nothing here I can write about but there's always something to write about. “You just have to hang around long enough and it comes eventually. https://youtu.be/a9NyQAFjDsY “I just took threads from here and there. I was going to call the album The Queensferry Crossing but thought that was a bit boring so I went for Sketches o' the Q.C. “It introduces a bit of ambiguity. If you Google the name you get lots of drawings of court scenes!” Eddie was inspired to write Columba Cannon after reading an article about the general foreman for the foundations and towers. https://youtu.be/y_y1y8oV7vo Eddie said: “It was the name that got me and that gave me the first line of the song "He is a bridge builder wi a missionary zeal" Has to be with a name like Columba!” Fishnet bridge was set in a meditative light, describing the bridge as a “thing of beauty that looks like a big fish net glistening high above the Forth but it is a symbolic fishnet with the song taking the form of an imaginary conversation with the bridge.” https://youtu.be/dJgsl2WQ5G0   “Midday starvation came from an article which highlighted the isolation of the workers working high up on the bridge,” he added. https://youtu.be/Dme-bfCXHRI “If you forget your piece you've had it and you starve for there's no nipping round to the corner shop for a pie. The article also said that a local pizza delivery firm regularly delivered a pallet load of warm pizzas to the bridge so that was "midday salvation"! Meanwhile, The boys frae the cheese is a play on words. https://youtu.be/phtQ2-Xx1I0 He added: “I read an article that said The Forth Estuary Transport Authority (FETA) could have acted sooner and avoided the costly closure of the bridge at the end of 2015.” Eddie is no stranger to music and song influenced by Dundee and wider Scottish history. In 2015 he featured in The Courier for his efforts to put the complete works of Robert Burns to music. With a piano style influenced by Albert Ammons, Champion Jack Dupree and Memphis Slim, and a song-writing style influenced by Matt McGinn, Michael Marra and Randy Newman, the former Perth High School pupil, who wrote the 1984 New Zealand Olympic anthem, has organised a number of projects over the years including the McGonagall Centenary Festival  for Dundee City Council in 2002. Last year’s Tay Road Bridge album included a tribute to 19th century poet William Topas McGonagall and also honoured Hugh Pincott – the first member of the public to cross the Tay Road Bridge in 1966. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y51tixl9GEs Thanks to The Courier, he also became one of the first to cross the Queensferry Crossing  when it opened to the public in the early hours of August 30.

Breaking

    Cancel