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Motoring news

Audi’s new Q cars

April 12 2017

Another week, another new Audi. Two new Audis, in fact. The German car maker has announced a couple more additions to its Q line up of SUVs. The Q4 is a coupe-SUV hybrid that will go up against the BMW X4 and Mercedes GLC Coupe. As its name suggests, it’ll be positioned between the compact Q3 and bigger Q5. At the other end of the scale is the Q8, which will go head to head against the Range Rover. It’s lower and sleeker than the Q7 Audi is also producing. In concept form, it sat only four people, although it seems likely the production version will be a five seater. There’s a 630 litre boot as well. Eagle eyed Audi followers will notice the only SUV slots left to fill are the Q1 and Q6. Watch this space...

Road tests

Audi Q2 puts quality over size

March 21 2018

Audi’s Q2 was one of the first premium compact SUVs on the market. It sits below the Q3, Q5 and the gigantic, seven seat Q7 in Audi’s ever growing range. Although it’s about the same size as the Nissan Juke or Volkswagen T-Roc, its price is comparable with the much larger Nissan X-Trail or Volkswagen Tiguan. Even a basic Q2 will set you back more than £21,000 and top whack is £38,000. Then there’s the options list which is extensive to say the least. My 2.0 automatic diesel Quattro S Line model had a base price of £30,745 but tipped the scales at just over £40,000 once a plethora of additions were totted up. Size isn’t everything, however. In recent years there’s been a trend of buyers wanting a car that’s of premium quality but compact enough to zip around town. It may be a step down in size but the Q2 doesn’t feel any less classy than the rest of Audi’s SUV range. The interior looks great and is user friendly in a way that more mainstream manufacturers have never been able to match. The simple rotary dial and shortcut buttons easily trounce touchscreen systems, making it a cinch to skim through the screen’s menus. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4eQ5p5Z7-Ek&list=PLUEXizskBf1nbeiD_LqfXXsKooLOsItB0 There’s a surprising amount of internal space too. I took three large adults from Dundee to Stirling and no one complained about feeling cramped. As long as you don’t have a tall passenger behind a tall driver you can easily fit four adults. At 405 litres the boot’s big too – that’s 50 litres more than a Nissan Juke can muster. Buyers can pick from 1.0 and 1.4 litre petrol engines or 1.6 and 2.0 litre TDIs. Most Q2s are front wheel drive but Audi’s Quattro system is standard on the 2.0 diesel, as is a seven-speed S Tronic gear box. On the road there’s a clear difference between this and SUVs by manufacturers like Nissan, Seat and Ford. Ride quality, while firm, is tremendously smooth. Refinement is excellent too, with road and tyre noise kept out of the cabin. It sits lower than the Q3 or Q5 and this improves handling, lending the Q2 an almost go-kart feel. On a trip out to Auchterhouse, with plenty of snow still on the ground, I was appreciative of the four-wheel drive as well. The Q2 is expensive – though there are some good finance deals out there – but you get what you pay for. Few cars this small feel as good as the Q2 does. Price: £30,745 0-62mph: 8.1 seconds Top speed: 131mph Economy: 58.9mpg CO2 emissions: 125g/km

Golf

Scott battles hard at windy West Kilbride

April 5 2010

Ewan Scott has already claimed one of the world's most prestigious junior titles at his first attempt, but the youngster from St Andrews had to dig deep to stay in his own national championship at a wet and windy West Kilbride on Monday. The Madras College pupil, already a scratch player at 14 and rated as one of the best young prospects to come out of the Home of Golf for decades, became the first Scot to win the Reid Trophy the English championship for under-14s at the Kendleshire near Bristol last August. However at the Scottish Boys Championship he found himself in a battle royal with Martin Scott, a three-handicapper from Hamilton who seemed to have the better of the tie standing at two up with six to play. Scott fought back to win the next two holes but saw his opponent drain a 35-foot birdie putt on the 16th, only for the Lanarkshire county player to miss a six-footer on the next to set up real drama on the final hole. Martin was 10 feet inside Ewan in two on the home green but the St Andrian sank his birdie putt from 30 feet only for Martin to follow him in from 20 to keep the match tied. Finally Ewan's greater power won him the tie on the second extra hole, driving the green and two-putting for birdie to secure the win. "It was much tougher than I expected or planned, but I didn't play my best today and hopefully that's my bad game out of the way this week,'' said Ewan. Playing on the links at St Andrews and also a member at the Duke's, Ewan's victory in England last year was a big signal that he's set for a big future in the game. "I just saw it as being a big tournament with the top juniors in Britain if not Europe and that's the kind of competition I want to play in, so to win was a big thrill,'' he said.ObstacleEwan was runner-up in the Scottish Under-14s and third in the Under-16s, and his hopes of moving on this year face a pretty big obstacle in fellow National Academy member Paul McPhee in the second round. Even if Ewan doesn't progress beyond the fourth round he reached at Royal Aberdeen last year, such is his early development that he has another four shots at this championship yet to come. McPhee, the son of former Dundee United and Forfar full-back Ian, is on his last opportunity and won a tight 2 and 1 victory over Kyle Reid of Elderslie. The top quarter of the draw saw further success for Fife with the New Club's Josh Jamieson, Calum McKay (Scotscraig) and Craig Wilson (Pitreavie) coming through their opening matches, while McPhee was joined in the second round by fellow Perth and Kinross players Sean Gatsby (Crieff), Charlie Linton (Dunblane New), Bradley Neil (Blairgowrie) and Stephen Harrower (Kinross). Monifieth duo Grant Bowman and Scott Smith also moved through, Bowman requiring the full 18 holes before besting Fergus Smith of Paisley while Smith swept aside Jason Duncan (Newmachar) 4 and 3. There were no real surprises on the first day with the first three nominal seeds (there are no official seedings in the boys') all coming through. Reigning strokeplay champion Jack McDonald moved through 6 and 4 against Jordan Shaw (Kingussie), championship backmarker Conor O'Neil of Pollok had some struggles to shake off late entrant Cameron Cunningham 4 and 2, the Royal Mussleburgh player having come in to replace John Henry, the brother of two-time champion Scott. The toughest test came for Jack Scott from Deeside, who had to battle all the way before winning one up against Callum Gorrie from Kilmarnock Barassie. Round One A Young (Garmouth and Kingston) bt C McBride (Peebles) 5 and 4N Clenaghan (Mount Ellen) bt R Boyle (Bathgate) 4 and 3W Kerr (Craigmillar Park) bt S Moore (Greenock Whinhill) 3 and 2P Gordon (Paisley) bt M Anderson (Douglas Park) 4 and 3E Mackay (Craigielaw) bt C MacLean (West Kilbride) 4 and 2J McDonald (Kilmarnock Barassie) bt J Shaw (Kingussie) 6 and 4S Harrower (Kinross) bt C Burgess (Musselburgh) 5 and 4B Neil (Blairgowrie) bt R O'Connor (Uphall) 1 holeC Wilson (Pitreavie) bt G Miller (Bathgate) 5 and 4S Hall (East Renfrewshire) bt R Jack (Dumfries and Galloway) 1 holeJ Gallagher (Crow Wood) bt L Pacitti (Sandyhills) 2 and 1C Linton (Dunblane New) bt L alliday (Cardross) 6 and 5P McPhee (King James VI) bt K Reid (Elderslie) 2 and 1E Scott (St Andrews) bt M Scott (Hamilton) at 20thR Hislop (Pines) bt A Loch (Pumpherston) 2 holesB MacDonald (Torrance House) bt J Manson (Oldmeldrum) 2 and 1A Blaney (Liberton) bt J Bryce (Strathaven) 4 and 3S Gadsby (Crieff) bt R Calladine (Dunaverty) 5 and 3M Smith (Troon Welbeck) bt J Innes (Kirkcudbright) 6 and 5K Mustard (Elgin) bt P Timmons (Troon St Meddans) at 19thJ Jamieson (St Andrews New) bt I McDowall (East Kilbride) 4 and 2G Forsyth (Inverness) bt G Caldwell (Inverness) 1 holeJ Scott (East Renfrewshire) bt S Thorburn (Ayr Belleisle) 5 and 4G Roger (Clober) bt P Green (Forres) 1 hole.G Foley (Ralston) bt C Scott (Duddingston) 7 and 5S Gray (West Lothian) bt R Di Murro (Greenock) 3 and 2J Reid (Mount Ellen) bt L Campbell (Baberton) 4 and 2G Bowman (Monifieth) bt F Smith (Paisley) 1 holeG Smail (Craigielaw) bt C Boyd (Lanark) at the 19thS Watt (Old Course Ranfurly) bt C Lamb (Newmachar) 2 holesC O'Neil (Pollok) bt C Cunningham (Royal Musselburgh) 4 and 2E Bradley (Mount Ellen) bt G Balfour (Douglas Park) 4 and 3J Scott (Deeside) bt C Gorrie (Kilmarnock Barassie) 1 holeA McDougall (Elderslie) bt C Norman (Dullatur) 2 holesR Campbell (Grangemouth) bt A McMillan (Easter Moffat) at 22ndG Nicoll (Glenbervie) bt J Wright (Forres) 2 and 1S Smith (Monifieth) bt J Duncan (Newmachar) 4 and 3C Kirkwood (Bearsden) bt R Simpson (Bonnyton) 2 and 1C Forbes (Carnwath) bt G Barrowman (Clydebank and District) 3 and 2L Gaughan (Bathgate) bt R Storrier (Downfield) 1 holeA Carrick (Douglas Park) bt S Smith (Deeside) 2 and 1R Wilkie (Greenock) bt G Young (Williamwood) at 19thG Chalmers (Dollar) bt J Milne (Elgin) 3 and 2P Sangster (Thurso) bt L Morgan (Newbattle) at 19thG Ritchie (Troon Welbeck) bt E Robertson (Inchmarlo) 3 and 2E Douglas (Dunblane New) bt J Reid (Drumpellier) 3 and 2C Cromar (Aboyne) bt T Dingwall (Nairn Dunbar) 2 and 1S Costello (Kirkhill) bt M Manson (Fortrose and Rosemarkie) 1 holeA Borg (Penwortham) bt B Todd (Greenburn) 4 and 3A Tillie (Grangemouth) bt J Thorburn (Dunfermline) 4 and 2M Giovannetti (Douglas Park) bt G Paterson (Ranfurly Castle) 2 and 1F Thain (West Linton) bt G Dunsmore (Saline) 2 holesD Docherty (Bonnyton) bt J Savage (Cawder) 2 holesC McKay (Grange) bt A Collier (Balbirnie Park) at 19thN McArthur (Bishopbriggs) bt R Beattie (Hawick) 3 and 1L Johnston (Dumfries and County) bt A Ferguson (Paisley) 1 holeC West (Scotscraig) bt A McLachlan (Bonnyton) 1 holeL McAlpine (Invergordon) bt D Wright (Cathcart Castle) 9 and 8G Stewart (Crieff) bt L Carruthers (Powfoot) 2 holesG Forrest (Craigielaw) bt C Mitchell (Leven Thistle) 3 and 2F Brown (Nairn Dunbar) bt L Chambers (Cardross) 3 and 1J Williams (Castle Douglas) bt A Whyte (St Andrews New) 3 and 2C Porciani (Ayr Belleisle) bt C McLay (Bishopbriggs) 6 and 5S Burgess (Nairn) bt R McKenzie (Troon Welbeck) 4 and 3C Stewart (Brora) bt G Burns (Williamwood) at 19thR Gillan (Torrance House) bt B Gibson (Troon Welbeck) 5 and 4S Wearing (Bishopbriggs) bt N McGregor (Stirling) 1 holeR Gordon (Alford) bt J Nordbo (Largs) 3 and 2J Burrows (Pitlochry) bt A Carrell (Peterculter) 1 holeA O'Donnell (Greenock Whinhill) bt A Wiseman (Fraserburgh) 4 and 3D Thompsett (Aboyne) bt R Munro (Monifieth) 1 holeI Watson (St Andrews) bt A Easton (Strathmore) 3 and 2R Black (Alness) bt S McPherson (Burntisland Golf House) 3 and 2C Beveridge (Troon Welbeck) bt F Sandison (Blairgowrie) 2 holes

Shows & Sales

Irish eyes smiling in the show ring at Stirling

February 15 2016

The luck of the Irish prevailed in the show ring at Stirling on Sunday with both the supreme champion and reserve supreme champion rosettes awarded to breeders from Northern Ireland. Leading the charge on the opening day of the second week of the spring Stirling Bull Sales was Derrycallaghan Fireworks, from grandfather and grandson duo Harold Stubbs and Alan Burleigh of Crummy, Ballindarragh. The duo, who took the same title at last year’s fixture, lifted this year’s rosettes with a February 2014-born AI son of Slimero Victory, out of Derrycallaghan Winner. Judge Gary Christie, of Midtown of Glass, Huntly, said the champion was a “well-fleshed young bull” with a “good bit of character about it”. Taking the reserve overall and intermediate champion rosettes was July 2014-born Kilbridge Farm Foreman from Billy, Michael and Matthew Robson, Doagh, Ballyclare. Foreman is a home-bred son of Crugmelyn Brenin out of Kilbride Farm Jolly 7T. The Robsons also took the reserve intermediate champion rosettes with August 2014-born Kilbride Farm Fearless, which is by Crugmelyn Brenin and out of Kilbride Farm Eunice 105B. Meanwhile, the senior champion title was awarded to Stewart Stronach, Berryleys Farm, Grange, Keith. Islavale Ferrari is a home-bred April 2014-born son of Curaheen Bandit, out of Islavale Victoria. The reserve senior champion title went to father and son duo Val and Conrad Fegan of Rostrevor, Newry, Northern Ireland. Knockreagh Feggy is an AI son of Kilbride Farm Bantry out of Knockreagh Annabelle. Meanwhile, the reserve junior champion rosettes were awarded to Michael Barlow, Foar Oaks, Ulnes Walton Lane, Leyland. Denizes Fantastic is a November 2014 AI son of Whitemire King Kong out of Denizes Tonia 4th. In the female section, the champion title went to Northern Irish breeder Robin Boyd, Slievenagh Farm, Portglenone. Sterling Myra’s Erin is an October 2013-born daughter of Sterling Cotswold 11, out of Thursford Myra 21st. Lastly, the reserve female champion title was awarded to Gerald and Morag Smith’s Drumsleed herd at Fordoun, Laurencekirk. Drumsleed Flick is a March 2014-born daughter of Grangewood William, by Popes Laird, out of Drumsleed Patti.

UK & World

This student took his Tinder profile to the next level by turning it into a PowerPoint presentation

February 21 2018

Standing out from the crowd on Tinder can be tough, but with the help of Microsoft PowerPoint a British student has managed just that – and gone viral in the process.Sam Dixey, a 21-year-old studying at Leeds University, made a six-part slideshow entitled “Why you should swipe right” – using pictures and bullet points to shrewdly persuade potential dates to match with him on the dating app. The slideshow includes discussion of his social life and likes, such as “petting doggos” and “laser tag”, and “other notable qualities and skills” – such as being “not the worst at sex” and “generous when drunk”.It even has reviews mocked up from sources such as “Donald Trump”, “Leonardo Di Capri Sun” and “The Times Guide to Pancakes 2011”.Sam told the Press Association the six-slide presentation only took about 20 minutes to make and “started off as a joke”.However, since being posted to Twitter by fellow Tinder user Gracie Barrow, Sam’s slideshow has been shared tens of thousands of times across social media.So, it’s got the seal of approval form Gracie, but how has the slideshow fared on Tinder? “I’d have to say it has been pretty successful,” Sam said. “Definitely a clear correlation of matches and dates beforehand to afterwards.“Most of the responses tend to revolve around people saying ‘I couldn’t help swipe right 10/10’ but I’ve had some people go the extra mile and message me on Facebook.“Plus some people have recognised me outside, in the library and on dates.”A resounding success.

Shows & Sales

Buyers rarely stray from budget at Simmental sale at Stirling Bulls

October 24 2013

THE SALE of Simmental bulls at Stirlng started slowly but by the time it came to the best of the intermediate and junior bulls trade had picked up with commercial producers vying with the pedigree breeders for the best of the offering. By the end of the sale 79 bulls had changed hands for an average of £5,641. This is back £165 on the year and represents a 63% clearance rate. Robin Tough, joint managing director of United Auctions, said: “Well grown good strong bulls were selling well throughout.” Simmental Catle Society chief executive Neil Shand agreed, adding: “It was obvious that people were bidding to a budget today. “For many of the commercial buyers 4,500 to 5,000gns seemed to be their ceiling. But we still managed to have the breed’s second highest average for an October sale.” The top price of 18,000gns went to veteran Northern Ireland consignor Billy Robson but not for his overall champion Kilbride Farm Detroit. Instead it was his stablemate Kilbride Farm Doubleaction which led the way. Doubleaction is a son of Kilbride Farm Warren, since sold for 9,500gns and out of Kilbride Farm Eustice. Doubleaction is off to join Anne MacPherson’s herd at Blackford, Croy. The next best was not far behind at 1,7000gns selling to Brian Grant, Dellfield. This was another from Northern Ireland, this time from father and son Robert and Richard Rodgers, Portglenone, Ballymena. Richard works full-time as a building contractor but still finds time to work with the family’s 75 pedigree cows. Hiltonstown Dominic is by Dirnanean Jacob son Auroch Amos and out of Hiltonstown Wallis, a granddaughter of Woodhall Premier. The pre-sale senior champion and reserve overall made 13,000gns for Lachlan Quarm, Holehouse, Irvine. His 21-month-old Annick Dalwhinnie came with show history having been the breed champion at Ayr Show this year. His sire, Skerington Visa, has a track record too having bred the February 2013 Stirling intermediate champion which went on to make Mr Quarm 11,000gns. Dalwhinnie is out of Annick Brackens Primrose, also the dam of the 20,000gns Annick Talisman. The purchaser yesterday was J Barclay and Son, Ardiecow, Fordyce, Banff. There was to be another 13,000gns transaction with Stewart Stronach, Berryleys, Keith selling Islavale Daz to A Wright, West Lundie, Argaty, Doune. Daz is by Chestermann Varney, a successful stock bull at Islavale and a senior champion at the last Perth bull sale where he was bought for 7,500gns. The judge, Alister Clark, Stratheast, Holm, Orkney backed his judgement by buying the reserve senior champion for 12,000gns. This was Corrick Dictator from Cecil McIlwaine, Corrick, Newtonstewart, Northern Ireland. Dictator is an AI son of Drumlone Anchor, a 10,000gns Stirling champion in 2010. Mr McIlwaine was notching up his sixth bull sales championship with Dictator and made it seven when he collected the junior championship with Corrick Dunedin. Billy Robson was also a vendor at the 12,000gns mark for another Kilbride Farm Warren son, Kilbride Farm Duke. This one is heading for pedigree duties with the Henry Widdecombes Starline herd in Devon. Other leading bull prices: 11,000gns John Dykes, South Slipperfield, West Linton to Mr Farland Northern Ireland for Mendick Delboy. 11,000gns Cecil McIlwaine to DN Campbell and Sons, Bardnaclavan, Thurso for junior champion Corrick Duneden. 9,000gns Finlay McGowan, Incheoch, Alyth to Blair Castle Estate, Blair Atholl for Dirnanean Diplomat. 8,500gns Gordon Clark, Broombrae, Auchtermuchty to JW Smith, Gladhill, Garmouth, Fochabers for Broombrae Dollar. 8,500gns Hector Macaskill, Woodhall, Dunbar to B Scott, Nistigar, Westray, Orkney for Woodhall Dynasty. Simmental females There was nothing between the female champion and the reserve when it came to the sale ring. Both made 4,000gns and went to the same buyer, J Innes and Sons, Dunscroft, Huntly. The champion, Ben-Nant Cadi from BT Raymond, Nantymab is a 31-month-old in-calf heifer by Hirwaun Rooney and out of Ben-Nant Whitney. The reserve, Magheragrigan Clare from TW Abraham, Irvinestown, Ballymena is also 31 months old and was sold in-calf to Curraheen Bossman.

Perth & Kinross

Culinary dimension added to Perth Show

July 28 2016

For more than 150 years Perth Show has been a popular, once a year meeting point for the people of the city and the farming community. The show - now the third largest of its type in Scotland – remains as always a showcase for champion livestock but this year holds a much wider appeal for visitors. To be held on Friday and Saturday August 5 and 6 on the South Inch, throughout the two days, trade stands, sideshows, entertainment, activities, music and parades all add to the vibrancy of the show along with a new culinary direction. “For the first time, Perth Show is set to feature a cookery theatre and food and drink marquee,” said show secretary Neil Forbes. “This will bring a new and popular dimension to the visitor attraction. “Perth Show 2016 is also delighted to welcome Perthshire On A Plate (POAP) - a major food festival, celebrating the very best in local produce and culinary talent. “Organised by Perthshire Chamber of Commerce, the two-day festival will run as part of the show and feature celebrity and local chefs, demonstrations and tastings, book signings, food and drink related trade stands, fun-filled activities for ‘kitchen kids’ and a large dining area and pop-up restaurants in a double celebration of food and farming.” Heading the celebrity chef line-up are television favourite Rosemary Shrager (Friday) and spice king Tony Singh (Saturday), backed by a host of talented local chefs including Graeme Pallister (63 Tay Street) and Grant MacNicol (Fonab Castle). The cookery theatre, supported by Quality Meat Scotland, will also stage a fun cookery challenge between students from Perth College and the ladies of the SWI. A range of pop-up restaurants featuring taster dishes from some of the area’s best known eating places will allow visitors to sample local produce as they relax in the show’s new POAP dining area. “We’re trying to create a wide and varied programme of entertainment,” said Mr Forbes. “Late afternoon on Friday will see the It’s A Knockout  challenge with teams from businesses throughout Perth and Perthshire competing against each other. “And the first day’s programme will end with a beer, wine and spirit festival where teams can celebrate their achievements and visitors can sample a wide range of locally produced drinks.” This year will also see the reintroduction of showjumping at Perth Show on the Saturday afternoon.

Farming news

Aberdeen-Angus DNA test hailed by Victor Wallace

February 13 2015

The adoption of a new DNA test to authenticate the pedigree of all Aberdeen-Angus calves will put the breed in the vanguard of genomic technology, retiring Aberdeen-Angus Cattle Society president, Victor Wallace, told a packed annual at Stirling. The society has decided to collect blood samples using special ear tags which incorporate a small uniquely identified receptacle. As the tag is inserted soon after birth the small amount of displaced tissue and blood is captured ready for future DNA testing. Responding to criticism of the society’s decision to use only one company, Caisley, for the collection of samples, Mr Wallace insisted Caisley was the only ear tag company which had the technology to meet the society’s required specification. “We invited a number of ear tag companies to tender and some didn’t bother to reply while others couldn’t meet the spec,” said Mr Wallace. “It is a simple and inexpensive system which most breeders are finding easy to use.” The aim is to collect blood samples from all bull calves to enable the sire of all calves to be verified in the case of any uncertainty or dispute and to authenticate beef being sold as Aberdeen-Angus.” The move by the society has been welcomed by major supermarkets selling Aberdeen-Angus beef. Mr Wallace added: “This process was extensively and rigorously tested with management and council visits to the manufacturers in Germany and the completion of field trials. After this process it was brought back to council and unanimously approved. “Like all changes, there has been some resistance but I am convinced that putting the society in a position to be leading in genomic testing can only be a good one. “We should be leaders, not followers.” Mr Wallace admitted that a £34,000 re-branding exercise carried out over the past year, which included the dropping of the society’s long-established black, green and yellow colours, left room for “significant improvement”. The issue, particularly improvement to the website, would, he said, be addressed in the coming year. The decision to prop up the pension fund of chief executive, Ron McHattie, by £120,000 in four tranches was defended by new president, David Evans, who explained that it was a “catching up” operation as the funding of the pension had not been addressed for 11 years and annuity rates had halved in that time. Mr Evans, who works as a financial adviser, runs a 60-cow pedigree herd in Cleveland with his wife, Penny, and has been chairman of the society’s breed promotion committee. He is planning a series of open days throughout the country this year to promote the commercial attributes of the Aberdeen-Angus breed. “There is a huge and growing demand for certified Aberdeen-Angus beef with the active involvement of most of the leading supermarkets in the UK and registrations in the Herd Book are at a record level and continuing to increase,” said Mr Evans. “But we can’t stand still and it is important that the breed adopts all the latest technology to take the breed forward in the future.” New senior vice-president is Tom Arnott, Haymount, Kelso, while Alex Sanger, Prettycur, Montrose, was appointed junior vice-president.

Golf

Strathmore golfer Kirsty Brodie gets Scottish selection

June 14 2016

Strathmore’s Kirsty Brodie has been named in the Scotland Girls’ side for the European Amateur Team Championship in Norway next month. A six-player team will contest the annual event, this year being held at Oslo GC from July 5 to 9. Brodie earned her place by finishing second in the recent Paul Lawrie Foundation Scottish Schools Championship at Murrayshall. Steve Paulding, Scottish Golf Performance Director, said: “This is a very young team and for the majority of them this will be their first European Championship. “The competition will be tough, but it will hopefully be a great learning experience for them. We are expecting each of the girls to go out and match their best performances of the year. It would be great to make the top eight matchplay stage, but that will require everyone to play at their best.” Full team - Kirsty Brodie (Strathmore, 16), Louise Duncan (West Kilbride, 16), Jillian Farrell (Cardross, 16), Joanne Free (Gullane Ladies, 18), Hazel MacGarvie (Troon Ladies, 16), Jasmine Mackintosh (Hazlehead, 16). The Scottish Boys’ team for their equivalent European event in Austria will be finalised after this week’s Sir Henry Cooper Junior Masters, where a number of players are competing. Scottish Boys champion Eric McIntosh (Bruntsfield Links GS) is the only automatic selection for the European team.

Motoring news

Join the queue for littlest Audi Q

November 9 2016

Audi’s relentless release of new models continues with the launch of its smallest SUV. The Q2 goes on sale in the UK next week with prices starting at £22,380. There’s an extensive selection of petrol and diesel power trains as well as the option of front or Quattro four-wheel drive. More models will be added to the range later on, including powerful SQ2 and RSQ2 versions. Aimed squarely at a younger audience, the Q2 has bolder, sharper lines and a different shape to Audi’s bigger SUVs, the Q3, Q5 and Q7. Although it’s clearly meant more for buzzing around cities than growling across farmland, cladding and skid plates lend it an aura of ruggedness. Audi is also offering a range of vibrant colours to deepen the Q2’s appeal to youthful buyers. The interior is as plush as you’d expect from Audi, justifying its price hike over similarly sized SUVs like the Nissan Juke and Honda HR-V. The materials are high quality – softtouch plastics, leather on higher spec cars and brushed aluminium trim elements all blended into a smart-looking package. As standard, drivers get a seven-inch infotainment screen on top of the dashboard. It’s operated through Audi’s rotary dial system that’s far more intuitive and easier to use when on the move than rivals’ touchscreen systems. Among the many options is Audi’s excellent Virtual Cockpit - a 12.3in screen that replaces the manual instruments behind the steering wheel. Overall, the Q2 is 4.7in shorter than the A3 hatchback, but Audi says there’s enough leg and headroom for two adult passengers in the back. Boot space comes in at 405 litres – 50 more than you’ll find in the A3 hatchback and rival Nissan Juke, although it trails the Mini Countryman by the same amount. To begin with, the only diesel option is a 1.6 litre with 114bhp, although a more powerful 184bhp 2.0 litre unit will be added to the range soon. Similarly, the petrol engine range is limited for now but will be expanded by the end of the year. The 1.4 litre, 148bhp unit offered now will be joined by 1.0 litre, 114bhp three cylinder turbo and 2.0 litre, 187bhp options – the latter coming with an S-Tronic automatic gearbox. When it arrives the 1.0 litre petrol version will be the cheapest model in the range with a price tag of £20,230. Courier Motoring has yet to get its hands on the car but early reviews have been very positive and Audi looks to have yet another winner on its hands. jmckeown@thecourier.co.uk

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