Graeme Murty insists he is not feeling the pressure of leading Rangers

February 17 2017, 7.33amUpdated: February 18 2017, 5.09pm
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Graeme Murty admits he will be held accountable if Rangers crash against Dundee – but insists he is not feeling the pressure of bossing the Ibrox outfit.

The Gers caretaker will remain in charge for Sunday’s trip to Dens Park after he was asked to take the wheel following Mark Warburton’s surprise exit.

The Under-20s coach’s first act was to oversee the Light Blues as they scraped passed Morton to book a William Hill Scottish Cup quarter-final slot.

But there will be Ladbrokes Premiership points at stake when they travel east to Tayside this weekend.

With Aberdeen now three points clear in second, defeat would further dent any ambitions of finishing runners-up to rampant leaders Celtic.

Former Reading defender Murty knows just how drastic the consequences are for the club but says he is ready to deal with whatever comes his way.

” Pressure comes when you acknowledge the possibility of failure,” he said as he met the media. “W hat do you guys think failure is for me and my role?

“It’s different when it’s a permanent manager. The only failure that I can see is not being impactful on the players.

“I’m not looking three or four months down the line. I’m just looking at making sure the players walk out onto the pitch clear of negative thoughts and ready to be excellent. That’s all.

“There are consequences for the club but does that add pressure? No, you just have to deal with things. I’ve said to the players it’s about reactions. You have to react to what occurs in the game and afterwards.

“I’ll be held accountable if we don’t win. That’s fine. I’ve been held accountable before and that’s fine. It’s the nature of the beast.

“If you don’t want to be in this business, then don’t be in the business.”

Dave King’s board are still weighing up their list of managerial options, with the likes of Alex McLeish, Derek McInnes, Billy Davies and Frank De Boer high on the list of reported candidates.

For the meantime, Murty has been told by chief executive Stewart Robertson that he will remain in charge for the “foreseeable future”.

He insists he has been pleased with the support he has received so far from the Ibrox board.

But he confessed the challenge of leading the team out at Celtic Park – where they visit on March 12 – would be a daunting prospect.

Given that Warburton’s side were smashed 5-1 by Brendan Rodger’s Hoops on their last trip to Parkhead back in September, Murty can be forgiven for admitting his sense of intimidation.

The 42-year-old said: “If you look at the history behind the clubs and look at the way they are playing at the moment then you would be daunted.

“But I always had the feeling when you go to a big stadium and you are the underdog, there was no better feeling than walking out with a good result.

“However, I think it would be incredibly arrogant and presumptuous of me to even look that far forward.

“I’m just cracking on with what I’m doing, then we’ll see what happens after Sunday’s game.”

Murty was at Scotstoun to see Glasgow Warriors play last Friday night when he got the shock call telling him he was now in charge.

It has been a whirlwind week since but he has vowed to learn from his stint as Gers boss.

“I’m enjoying it,” he said. “It’s different, it’s challenging. I didn’t anticipate this at all. But I think it would be daft not to enjoy it.

“I don’t enjoy the games because I get incredibly frustrated kicking every ball.

“But I will enjoy the experience and I will try to get the maximum growth from it personally.”

Rangers stuck rigidly to a 4-3-3 under Warburton but Murty showed he is prepared to be flexible when he went with a two-man strike force late on against Ton.

There may be further changes but they will not be rushed.

Murty explained: “It will be gradual. There are very good players here in the squad. The style of play we have is very possession based – but that’s all the things we have done all the way through the academy.

“It’s about dominating the ball and making sure we get it back quickly.

“The changes I’ve made haven’t been about style, they’re about my personality. That’s what the difference is.

“I do things slightly different to the previous manager and I can’t try to be him.

“So I’ve said to the players I will try to make the disruption as minimal as possible, but this is me and how I work.”

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