Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Go-ahead given for college building to be converted into flats

The old Dundee College building on Constitution Street.
The old Dundee College building on Constitution Street.

Plans to “revamp” the derelict college tower on Constitution Road in Dundee into high quality rented apartments have been given the go-ahead for the second time.

Permission to convert the high-rise building was originally granted in 2016. After the latest decision, it will be transformed into 111 single and double room serviced apartments.

Dundee City Council’s planning committee – recently renamed from the development management committee – approved the proposal by 22 votes to five at a meeting last night.

Voxcap Investments, the Edinburgh company behind the development, hopes to attract young graduates and new professionals in the city – sometimes regarded as so-called “generation rent” – who would rent out apartments in the fully managed complex.

As well as offering secured entry and exit points, an on-site concierge and off-street parking, Voxcap representative Eve McCurrich said there were plans to convert the former lecture theatre into a space capable of acting as a private residents’ cinema or even open art space.

Company director John Shepard, who was part of the deputation last night, explained that following the Brexit vote in 2016, investors for the former Dundee College campus site re-evaluated their backing, causing the planned works to stall and a redesign to be submitted in October last year.

The site has, in recent years, become an “eyesore”, with graffiti sprayed on its external walls.

The developers have promised to keep the main concrete structure, but re-clad and rework the external features of the building as part of the work.

Mr Shepard said the development’s core and target market would be: “Graduates and people in new jobs, people who the city wants to retain after they finish university.”

Members voted in favour of the development after Councillor Mark Flynn put forward an amendment to refuse permission, citing the single bedroom properties as too small and inadequate parking provision, which was defeated.

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]