Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Plan to step up security to tackle vandalism at abandoned Fife hospital

The building is in a dangerous state of decay after a fire ravaged the once successful hotel.
The building is in a dangerous state of decay after a fire ravaged the once successful hotel.

A former Fife hospital is to be made secure following a surge in vandalism.

The Thornton Fever Hospital has been abandoned for several decades and is a popular target with so-called “urban explorers”.

However, the complex on Strathore Road has also become a playground for criminals, with several acts of vandalism having taken place recently at the site.

In a bid to curb any further illegal activity, officials from Fife Council and Police Scotland have joined together to develop a strategy aimed at protecting the abandoned structure.

Neil Mitchell, the council’s service manager for building standards and public safety, said: “We had a meeting with the owner and Police Scotland to discuss how best to address the public safety and vandalism issues of the site.

“The owner is due to progress some work in the next few weeks to make the main entrance more secure, raise awareness of the dangers of entering these buildings and reduce the impact for local residents.”

Originally opened in 1902 as an isolation unit, Thornton Fever Hospital evolved in to a mental health hospital before its closure in 1967.

Engineering reports from 1965 suggested that around £15,000 of structural repairs were required to make the building safe – however, it found use as a school in the 1970s for boys with mental and social disorders.

A care home was then established at the site in the 1980s.

However, it has remained abandoned since and has fallen in to a state of decay, despite planning permission having been granted in 2009 for the construction of 20 homes and five flats.

With just a handful of homes located nearby, the building has become a favourite with urban explorers, groups that enter derelict buildings to chart their current state in online forums.

However, given the condition of the building and the potential risks posed by any structural failure, Mr Mitchell said that steps were needed to keep the public out.

He added: “We’ll review the measures over the coming months and whether we need to consider further action to ensure public safety.”

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]