Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Comment: A formidable queue forms for Team Europe Ryder Cup captain

Graeme McDowell, Lee Westwood, Robert Karlsson, Padraig Harrington and Luke Donald with Thomas Bjorn after yesterday's Ryder Cup announcements at Wentworth.
Graeme McDowell, Lee Westwood, Robert Karlsson, Padraig Harrington and Luke Donald with Thomas Bjorn after yesterday's Ryder Cup announcements at Wentworth.

Four men with 56 Ryder Cup points between them – that’s the quality of roster from which Thomas Bjorn can now pick his back-up team for Paris.

The Template – it doesn’t sound as exciting as the USA’s Task Force! but it’s been more effective for longer – demands these days that future European captains serve their time in the backroom. Paul McGinley set in stone at Gleneagles in 2014 that they should number as many as five, and Bjorn isn’t about to change that.

He’d already recruited his long-time friend Robert Karlsson. He’s now added Padraig Harrington – already short-odds favourite for the next one in Whistling Straits in 2020 – Lee Westwood, Luke Donald and Graeme McDowell.

You can almost see the progression of future captains, although remember it won’t be too long before Ian Poulter, Sergio Garcia and Justin Rose join the queue.

It’s a formidable looking queue for certain, and bolsters whoever represents Europe, in Paris in September or in future, with quality knowledge on how to play and win this unique event.

For Scottish eyes, though, it makes for a curious thought. It seems now that Paul Lawrie, a vice-captain last time with Darren Clarke and twice a team member with distinction at Brookline in 1999 and Medinah in 2012, will not be a Team Europe captain.

That’s understandable considering the quality of candidate coming through, who may not have Paul’s major championship win but have vast experience of Ryder Cups – Donald, let’s not forget, has played on four teams and never been on a losing side.

But it seems certain now that future generations will look back on this time and see Scotland’s last two major champions of the 20th century did not captain Europe, while two Scots who didn’t win major titles did.

It’s easy to imagine our grandchildren looking down the list and being puzzled why double major champion and Ryder Cup hero Sandy Lyle was never captain, yet McGinley (for whom I have the greatest admiration as a captain and a man) and Mark James were.

There are some valid reasons why that happened and the Ryder Cup is a different animal, for sure. But it’s still a curious thing.

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]