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Banning orders for three Dundee men after football rammy

Banning orders for three Dundee men after football rammy

Three football thugs were today handed football bans over a mass rammy ahead of a Scottish Premiership match that led to innocent civilians being trapped as police tried to contain the violence.

Lemmy Milne, Alexander Middleton and Grant Fender admitted charges over an incident before the Dundee United v Aberdeen match on December 13 last year.

They were arrested following an incident at the Snug Bar in Dundee’s Church Street before the top-flight clash.

Police dogs had to be brought in as cops struggled to keep the groups of hooligans apart.

Fiscal depute Alex Piper told Dundee Sheriff Court the incident started when a large group of Aberdeen fans turned up at the bar, which was packed with United supporters.

She said: “Aberdeen fans arrived in a large group and made their way to the Snug Bar where Dundee United fans were drinking.

“A ruckus happened inside where there was a confrontation that spilled out into the street.

“Police arrived almost immediately.

“There were people lunging at each other, threats of violence and aggressive behaviour on both sides in the street.

“Police kept them apart but a number of civilians were trapped.

“Police dogs had to be brought in to keep the peace.”

Milne, 17, Middleton, 41, and Fender, 29, all of Dundee, pleaded guilty to charges under the Offensive Behaviour at Football and Threatening Communications Act of “engaging in behaviour that is likely or would be likely to incite public disorder by forming part of a disorderly crowd and repeatedly attempting to engage in violence with rival fans”.

Milne was ordered to carry out 100 hours of unpaid work on a community payback order, Middleton got 120 hours and Fender 140 hours.

All three were given football banning orders preventing them from attending matches in the UK for 12 months.

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This article originally appeared on the Evening Telegraph website. For more information, read about our new combined website.