Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Leslie Odom Jr explains why he initially turned down One Night In Miami

Leslie Odom Jr in One Night In Miami (Patti Perret/Amazon Studios)
Leslie Odom Jr in One Night In Miami (Patti Perret/Amazon Studios)

Leslie Odom Jr has explained why he initially turned down the role of singer Sam Cooke in One Night In Miami.

The actor and singer, best known for originating the role of Aaron Burr in the Broadway production of Hamilton, says he said no to the chance to play the A Change Is Gonna Come musician in the film that imagines the meeting between Cooke, Malcolm X, Cassius Clay and Jim Brown in 1964, because he feared he would do a bad job.

He told the PA news agency: “Who would want to do that? Sam Cooke – those are mighty big shoes and it took me about 15 years to get any kind of acceptance for who I am.

“Hamilton was really the thing that allowed people to have a little bit of putting a name with a face, and I just felt like I can be myself a little bit.

“Because when you start out, people are like ‘You’re the next Denzel!’ or ‘You’re not quite Denzel enough’, or ‘You’re the next Don Cheadle’, ‘You’re not quite Don Cheadle enough’, and so for the first time I felt people were letting me be the very best version of Leslie Odom Jr, so why would I try to be a terrible Sam Cooke?

“But it was Kemp Powers’ script that really won me over, he was trying to do something daring in this movie and I knew that Regina (King, the director) was the one to lead the way.”

British actor Kingsley Ben-Adir, who plays Malcolm X shortly before he split publicly with Nation Of Islam leader Elijah Muhammad and a year before he was murdered, said he also felt nervous to take on the role, but was determined King, the Oscar-winning actress who was making her directorial debut, would not know.

He said: “I wanted to present her with my own version of fearlessness because I didn’t want her to feel at any stage that the person she was employing to play Malcolm X was cautious or unsure, even though the Malcom in this film required such a huge vulnerability.

“Even if I was frightened, I was fronting to Regina that I was super-confident and there was nothing scary about it and it was something that I wanted to do.

“I don’t know how much of that was a defence mechanism, trying to block out how significant the pressure was.

Kingsley Ben-Adir as Malcolm X
Kingsley Ben-Adir as Malcolm X (Patti Perret/Amazon Studios)

“But the good thing for us was by the time I was cast I only had 12 days to prepare, so I didn’t have time to worry or think about anything, other than trying to do a real deep dive into Malcom and who he was, and more importantly who he was at this time, on this night.

“I think one of the most interesting things about this project was understanding in the research that the changes that were going on for Malcolm at this time were huge, there was a real sense that his life was in danger and his religious and political thinking was about to undergo a huge shift.”

One Night In Miami is out now on Amazon Prime Video.

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]