Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Fife SNP councillor Kate Stewart quits party to sit as an independent

Kate Stewart campaigned against period poverty.
Kate Stewart campaigned against period poverty.

A Fife SNP councillor has quit the party and will sit as an independent member of the council.

Kate Stewart has represented the West Fife and Coastal Villages ward since she was elected in 2012.

She was re-elected in 2017, when she said it was “a privilege and a pleasure to serve”.

Mystery surrounds her decision to leave the SNP and Ms Stewart has declined to comment.

She said only: “I will continue to serve the West Fife and Coastal Villages.”

Fife Council’s SNP group leader, David Alexander, said Ms Stewart had decided to leave for personal reasons.

David Alexander.

“We’ve not fallen out with her or anything like that,” he said.

“It was a personal decision and we’ve parted on good terms.

“We’re disappointed but she’s still a friend.”

The SNP co-leads Fife Council as part of a joint administration with Labour.

Despite Ms Stewart’s resignation, the party still has 29 councillors – more than any other party.

Labour has 23, the Conservatives 14 and the Liberal Democrats have seven.

East Neuk and Landward councillor Linda Holt quit the Conservative group in 2019 to sit as an independent member.

However, she recently joined George Galloway’s Alliance4Unity party, leaving Ms Stewart the only independent councillor.

Fife Council has already updated its website.

Ms Stewart stood as a Scottish Socialist Party candidate in the UK Parliament election in 2001, and again for the Scottish Parliament in 2003.

Campaign

During her time on the council, she has been instrumental in the campaign to commemorate women accused of witchcraft in the 1700s.

Last year, she helped organise an event to remember the accused women of Culross, Torryburn and Valleyfield.

An estimated 380 Fifers, most of them women, were accused of practising black magic between the 16th and 18th centuries.

Many were imprisoned, tortured, hanged and then burned.

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]