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Storm Ophelia: Is Tayside and Fife in the clear as deadly ex-hurricane heads out to sea?

Dare devils run out to a diving board Salthill, Galway, as Hurricane Ophelia batters the UK and Ireland earlier this week.
Dare devils run out to a diving board Salthill, Galway, as Hurricane Ophelia batters the UK and Ireland earlier this week.

Tayside and Fife is almost in the clear as the deadly Storm Ophelia dwindles and heads out to sea.

The Met Office yellow warning of wind for the region has now been cancelled, having previously been in place until 3pm this afternoon.

The worst of the weather is believed to be out of the way with the centre of the former tropical hurricane now in the North Sea between the UK and Scandinavia.

A man take selfies in waves and high wind at Lahinch in County Clare on the West Coast of Ireland as Hurricane Ophelia hits.

Ophelia is said to be “weakening quite rapidly”.

Met Office meteorologist Emma Sharples said: “It is still quite breezy and we do have a yellow warning out until 3pm this afternoon. Some places are still seeing strong winds. Generally things are easing.

“Western part is clearing now really. There are mixtures of bright spells, cloud and the patchy rain as we go through today. It’s a bit hit and miss really.

“The centre of ex-hurricane Ophelia is between us and Scandinavia in the North Sea. We have still got some strong winds each side, in England and eastern Scotlandas well.

“It is weakening quite rapidly now. It will be clear of our shores by dusk really.”

The highest wind speed recorded in the UK overnight was in Aberdaron, Wales, at 90mph.

The strongest gusts in Scotland were 76mph in Dundrennan, Dumfries and Galloway, and 71mph in Lanarkshire.

Waves whipped up by Hurricane Ophelia crash over the seafront in Penzance

Nothing in the UK matched the gusts at Fastnet Rock in Ireland yesterday, which were just shy of 120mph.

Storm Ophelia hit Scotland in the early hours of Tuesday morning and caused disruption across the transport network, with a number of flights from Scottish airports to Belfast and Dublin cancelled.

Trains across the east coast have been delayed and cancelled after a tree came down on the line near Markinch, with a number of roads across Fife also affected by blockages.

Cork City FCs stadium, a roof blows off a Cork school and a satellite image of Ophelia.

The Forth Road Bridge and Queensferry Crossing were both shut to double decker buses during the rush hour because of the high winds this morning.

The weather also closed the Tay Road Bridge to double deckers, with a 30mph speed put limit in place. Drivers were also being urged to be cautious going across the Friarton Bridge near Perth.

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