Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

POLL: Should branded school uniform be binned to cut cost of kitting out kids?

Blazers and branded sweaters can cost much more than generic clothing.
Blazers and branded sweaters can cost much more than generic clothing.

Should branded school uniform be ditched to cut the cost to families?

As new guidance is developed for school uniform policy in Scotland, we want to know what our readers think about the rules around what children wear for class.

Some pupils are required to wear blazers with their school crest, others branded sweatshirts, hoodies and polo shirts.

But with the rising cost of living putting pressure on family budgets, cutting the cost of kitting out kids for school is more important than ever.

Increasing the use of generic uniform items which parents can buy wherever they choose is one option likely to be encouraged by the Scottish Government.

These would include plain coloured sweaters and polo shirts which are usually cheaper than those branded with school logos.

What do you think?

What are the costs?

Uniform items listed for sale for local schools include blazers for St Paul’s Academy, Dundee, at £48, for Monifieth High School at £48 and Kirkcaldy High School £37.99. Blairgowrie High School’s blazers are £42.99 and the prefect hoodie is £19.40.

Logo sweatshirts for many primary schools in Tayside and Fife start at £12.99, while cardigans are £14.99 and single polo shirts £10.99.

By contrast, five plain polo shirts can be bought in Asda for £6, and two coloured school sweatshirts for £4.

New guidance for school uniform policy in Scotland

Principles likely to be included in the new guidance include that uniform policy in Scotland’s schools:

  • seeks to reduce costs
  • recognises the need for practicality, including in all seasons
  • reflects sustainability
  • is informed by views of children and young people.

Before it is finalised, pupils, parents and carers are being for their views to help shape it.

The guidance will not be binding but will be taken into account by local authorities and individual schools in setting their own rules.

The cost can be a significant burden for families.”

Education Secretary Shirley-Anne Somerville

Education Secretary Shirley-Anne Somerville said: “School uniform can promote a sense of identity, belonging and connectedness to school.

“However, the cost can be a significant burden for families, although there is no legal requirement to wear uniform.

“We have increased the school clothing grant to help families who need it most.

“Now we intend to go further by bringing forward national guidance aimed at reducing uniform costs.

“This could mean increasing the use of generic items of uniform.”

School clothing grants increased to at least £120 for primary school pupils and £150 for secondary school pupils last year.

School uniforms: Should there be national guidance to keep costs down?

Are you paying more for girls’ school uniforms than boys’? Research says it’s likely

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]

Conversation

[[title_reg]]

Please enter the name you would like to appear on your comments. (It doesn’t have to be your real name - but nothing rude please, we are a polite bunch!) Use a combination of eight or more characters that includes an upper and lower case character, and a number.

By registering with [[site_name]] you agree to our Terms and Conditions and our Privacy Policy

Or sign up with

Facebook Google

[[content_reg_complete]]

[[title_login]]

Or login with

Forgotten your password?

[[title]]


More from The Courier Education team

More from The Courier