Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

£8 million river powered heating for Perth plan backed by councillors

The £8 million plan will use water heat pumps to supply power from the Tay.
The £8 million plan will use water heat pumps to supply power from the Tay.

Hundreds of homes, businesses and a school in Perth will soon be heated by an innovative project which harnesses the power of the river Tay.

Councillors unanimously backed the business case for the £8 million plan which will use water heat pumps to capture renewable energy from the river – without damaging wildlife – and create a district heating network which will supply cheap heat to buildings in North Muirton, adjacent to the Tay.

“We in Perth and Kinross have an opportunity with this scheme to lead the field,” Councillor John Kellas told a full meeting of the council.

 

The scheme, in its first stage, would supply affordable heat to four business plots, 211 houses, North Muirton Primary School and the Colonsay Centre.

Commending the scheme, Councillor Ian Miller, leader of the administration, said: “Just as importantly, the infrastructure created at the start of the project will be designed to allow it to expand.

“This would ultimately connect to the entire Perth Food and Drink Park, supplying 1700 residential properties in North Muirton/Muirton and eight council buildings including North Muirton Primary School, Perth Grammar School and North Inch Community Campus.”

Mr Miller said that social housing tenants would benefit from reduced bills, slashing £200 per year from electric heating and £100 per year from gas heating for tenants.

It will reduce carbon emission by 450 tonnes a year and could attract businesses to the food and drink park by allowing them to access cheaper heat and electricity and boost their green credentials.

Councillors Ian Campbell and Mac Roberts expressed some misgivings about “unproven” technology and the projected savings on fuel which local households would enjoy.

Councillor John Kellas told them it was important to look at this as part of a longer term strategy.

The approval included an amendment proposed by Mr Campbell that the director of the environment service be asked to bring back a further report with more detailed financial modelling of the scheme

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]