Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Plan to free up starter farms for new entrants

Land in public ownership has the potential to offer a route into farming
Land in public ownership has the potential to offer a route into farming

Starter unit farms within Scotland’s million acres of  publicly-owned land could hold the solution to the crippling shortage of opportunities currently available to the next generation of farmers.

A 10 point plan has been published by the Scottish Government outlining how starter farms on land owned by Scottish Natural Heritage, the Crofting Estate, the National Forest Estate, the Crown Estate, local authorities, Scottish Water and others can be made available to new entrants.

The recommendations, contained in the final report of a short life industry-led group, set out how start-up grants, access to Basic Payments allied to advice and skills programmes can facilitate entry and allow individuals to develop.

The report received the backing of Rural Economy Secretary Fergus Ewing who said he believed that there was a supply of land in public ownership with the potential to offer a route into farming for new entrants.

“That is why we established this short life group to investigate how this land could be used to kick start the next generation of farmers, secure food production and boost our economy for years to come,” he said.

But while the Scottish Association of Young Farmers’ Clubs rural affairs chairman Sarah Allison said the report was  a big step forward in recognising the issues and proposing solutions to the lack of land availability to new entrants, it was not enough.

She added: “This on its own will not address the chronic lack of land available, and further work must be done to assess what kind of business environment is needed to create a thriving tenanted sector in Scotland once again.”

The recommendations include: a coordinated approach by the different organisations who manage publicly owned land and the development of a new entrants opportunities programme; communication with publicly owning land managers to identify and encourage the letting of smaller units as the initial building block of any  new entrant business; flexibility about lease alterations to allow growth; advertising new opportunities on the Scottish Government website as well as usual regional and national outlets.

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]