Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

First buses cross Forth Road Bridge in new dawn for public transport

Buses started to use the bridge on Friday
Buses started to use the bridge on Friday

The transformation of the Forth Road Bridge into a public transport corridor started on Friday as the first buses were allowed across.

Work has been carried out on the bridge in the weeks following the opening of the Queensferry Crossing to prepare it for its new role.

A number of services used the 53-year-old bridge,  with more buses, taxis and motorcycles to follow in the coming weeks.

A transport expert is calling on the public to capitalise on Scotland’s first public transport-only artery road bridge.

Dr Steve Cassidy, the director of ESP Group with a PhD in travel behaviour, said: “Having Scotland’s first public transport-only bridge on an artery road could be very significant for Edinburgh and south Fife.

“This first stage launched on Friday will see scheduled public buses using the Forth Road Bridge, but the next stage will also include other buses, taxis and motorcycles –which is when we’ll really start to see an impact.

“The public should capitalise on what should be a faster bus service – if there is higher demand operators may also adjust schedules to accommodate additional services.

“As we look to the future of transport we need to continue to consider how innovative new approaches can help people move away from single occupancy vehicles.

“This approach shows that Scotland is making real changes to help accommodate an exciting new world of transport options.”

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]