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Work to reinforce eroding Broughty Ferry coastline to begin as early as next month

The coastal protection measures would affect the Grassy Beach area of Broughty Ferry
The coastal protection measures would affect the Grassy Beach area of Broughty Ferry

Work on coastal protection measures stretching several miles along the coast at Broughty Ferry could begin as early as next month.

The Ferry, which has been identified as an area at significant risk of erosion, could see its area from Grassy Beach to the castle reinforced.

Councillors will vote on Monday at a meeting of the council’s city development committee on whether to approve the first stage in a tendering process.

They will also vote on whether to accept a tender for minor natural protection measures using reshaped dunes fronting the Esplanade.

The two projects combined are estimated to cost upwards of £600,000.


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Work on the Esplanade would get under way next month and finish by early summer, while the Grassy Beach stretch would start in the summer and take around 18 months to complete.

Mark Flynn depute convener of the council’s city development committee said the design of the measures must not detract from the area’s scenery, popular with visitors worldwide.

He said: “It is crucial that we not only ensure effectiveness and value for money when delivering flood protection for our coastal communities but also that any scheme is attractive and in keeping with the buildings and streetscape around it.

“Sometimes a natural solution, with a bit of tweaking and sculpting, is the best solution, while in other places sympathetic engineering work will have to be done to make sure people and properties are protected.

“These two reports demonstrate that one size does not necessarily fit all, but that we will find the right solution for the circumstances.”

The tender to carry out the minor reshaping of the dunes is just over £245,000, with some of this going towards measures to help the natural process of making them higher and wider.

80% of the costs are funded by the Scottish Government.

The cost to procure the construction of the Grassy Beach protection measures is estimated at £350,000 through the the Scape Major Works Framework through McLaughlin and Harvey Building and Civil Engineers.

This cash will go towards pre-contract design and project development, with the full tender price to be brought back for a committee decision in due course.

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