Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

More than half of Fife secondary pupils not engaging with schools’ home learning

Schools are using systems including GLOW to send pupils work.
Schools are using systems including GLOW to send pupils work.

More than half of Fife’s secondary pupils and one in four primary pupils were not engaging with schools’ home learning at the end of April.

Figures compiled by Fife Council showed participation rates of 42% for secondary school pupils and 77% for primary school pupils in the last week of April.

Engagement was lowest, 39%, in schools in the Auchmuty and Viewforth high school catchment areas in Glenrothes and Kirkcaldy and highest, 84%, in Dunfermline and St Columba’s high school catchments.

However, by the middle of May the proportion of pupils engaging had risen to 63% at secondary level and 81% at primary.

While schools are closed during the coronavirus pandemic teachers are issuing work for children to do at home and communicating with them using systems including the Scottish schools national intranet, GLOW.

Engagement, the council said, had increased but further improvement was needed and teachers were supporting families where barriers were identified.

However, Fife councillor Linda Holt, the parent of a high school pupil, said: “I shudder to think how far missing three months of schooling has set back Fife’s pupils.”

The independent member for East Neuk and Landward welcomed information provided to councillors from the education service but said it remained unclear what engagement constituted.

She said: “It could be as little as opening a book once or a single online assignment.”

She also said there was no analysis of the impact of prolonged social isolation on children and teenagers.

The report, which was seen by The Courier, said lack of IT availability or skills was the biggest barrier to engagement.

Some parents had also chosen to do their own home schooling or focused on wellbeing rather than education.

Pupil motivation, parents working from home, additional support needs and stress, anxiety and illness within families were further factors.

The report said devices and IT advice had been provided to some families and work undertaken with O2 to provide 4G WiFi hotspots where broadband was poor.

Further support by phone calls, text and email had also been given to some families and more individual work planned.

Shelagh McLean, head of education, said: “I’m immensely proud of the way our teachers have risen to the challenges we’ve faced over the last few months and the improving levels of engagement that we see our pupils enjoying as they learn at home.

“We’re all learning over the course of this crisis – virtual classrooms are now the new normal – and it’s testament to huge efforts by staff and parents that children are continuing their learning in this way.”

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]