Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner. Facebook Messenger An icon of the facebook messenger app logo. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Facebook Messenger An icon of the Twitter app logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. WhatsApp Messenger An icon of the Whatsapp messenger app logo. Email An icon of an mail envelope. Copy link A decentered black square over a white square.

EVE MUIRHEAD: Euro champs Team Mouat are ‘greatest ever’ Scotland curling team contenders

Bruce Mouat's rink have now won four European gold medals.

Team Mouat won another European curling gold for Scotland.
Team Mouat won another European curling gold for Scotland. Image: WCF.

Comparing eras is incredibly difficult in any sport when it comes to saying who deserves a ‘greatest’ tag.

Curling is no different.

There have been some really strong Scottish teams from my dad’s era and before who didn’t get a chance to go to an Olympics because it wasn’t included.

Grand Slams didn’t exist and the sport in general has changed beyond recognition in terms of professionalism and the facilities the current curlers get access to.

But what isn’t in doubt is that Team Mouat are already in the conversation as far as the best men’s team Scotland has ever produced is concerned.

On Saturday they won their fourth European gold.

That alone is seriously impressive.

And you can add a World gold and an Olympic silver.

Different people will have their own ideas on where you rank those achievements in order of importance (Dave Murdoch has two World golds and an Olympic silver) but what isn’t up for debate is that Bruce and the guys have the opportunity to now go on to make a pretty emphatic ‘greatest’ argument.

Last week was the latest example of Team Mouat reaffirming their status as a big game team.

They don’t lose many finals, that’s for sure.

There was talk going into the Euros that they’d been below par this season and you could see that in their Grand Slam record.

There was a quarter-final defeat in one and they didn’t even make it to the knock-outs in another.

But they produced when they really needed to on home ice.

They had a realistic shot at gold at the last Olympics and came very close to doing it.

One of the most impressive things about Team Mouat is the length of time they’ve been together as a four – since the summer of 2017.

My team changed and evolved over the years – most do these days.

But a key to their success has been their stability.

I’m sure they have their moments when they need their time apart (they had six weeks in a bubble together at one point during Covid!)

But finding a way to keep things going on and off the ice is an under-rated quality that has served Team Mouat so well.


This is a very strong era for Scotland.

I’d loved to have been a fly on the wall for the European selection meetings because Team Whyte are sixth in the world and pushing Team Mouat hard these days.

A bit like Andy Murray finding himself in the Federer/Nadal/Djokovic era, people might think they’re unlucky to come up against such a strong rival in their own country.

They just have to hold onto a mindset of pushing harder and harder to keep improving and be ready for their chance to come.

That was the case for me when Kelly Wood was the dominant curler, with two Olympic Games, Scottish titles and loads of other achievements on her CV.

And Team Whyte also need to look at Sweden’s Team Wrana getting the better of Anna Hasselborg’s great rink to be selected for the Euros.

Nothing lasts forever.

The Scottish Championships in February will be an opportunity for Team Whyte to make a big statement.

Conversation