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Food blogger: These delicious apple and cinnamon scones are ideal for cold November days

Catherine Devaney, owner of Harper and Lime, waxes lyrical about a homemade favourite.

This week, Catherine Devaney, owner of Harper and Lime, waxes lyrical about a homemade favourite.

Is anything more nostalgic than the smell of apples baked with cinnamon on a cold day

Small, pale green with flashes of russet, the apples from our gnarly old trees are crisp, thick-skinned little beauties with a playful tartness that is quite unlike the sweetness of a supermarket apple.

Dipped in chocolate or swirled in caramel, there’s no more traditional Bonfire Night treat.

Afternoon tea

Never one to pass up a scone, I’ve been baking an apple, cinnamon and brown sugar version.

Studded with juicy chunks and a hint of cinnamon, the brown sugar adds a slight caramel flavour that pairs so well with the tart apple, while cooking the apples with cinnamon first seems to intensify the flavour.

I like to make wee ones for afternoon tea by the fire, eaten warm with salted butter, a little bramble jelly or even a sliver of sharp cheddar.

Apple and cinnamon scones with bramble jelly.

Apple scones recipe

Peel, core and dice three to four small apples (less if your apples are bigger).

Melt 25g butter in a pot until foaming then add the apples and stir in 2 tsp brown sugar and 1 tsp cinnamon.

Cook on a low heat for 10 minutes until they start to soften – just stir and add a splash of water if it starts to stick.

Leave to cool slightly. Put 250g self-raising flour, 1 tsp baking powder, 20g caster sugar and 20g light brown sugar in a bowl.

Grate 40g cold butter and rub into the dry ingredients. Beat one egg lightly with 125ml milk, then pour gradually into the dry ingredients while mixing with a fork.

Use your hands to lightly bring the mixture together into a dough. Add the cooked apples and knead lightly on a well-floured surface so that the apples are evenly distributed.

Gently roll to 2-3cm thickness. Cut out the scones – I use a 5.5cm cutter, which should make at least eight small scones – brush the tops lightly with beaten egg or milk, place on a baking sheet

Bake at 200C Fan/220C/425F/Gas Mark 7 for 15-20 minutes until risen and golden.


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