Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner. Facebook Messenger An icon of the facebook messenger app logo. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Facebook Messenger An icon of the Twitter app logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. WhatsApp Messenger An icon of the Whatsapp messenger app logo. Email An icon of an mail envelope. Copy link A decentered black square over a white square.

Councillors approve ‘absolutely necessary’ 6.7% Angus rent rise

Angus Council's rent-setting committee also heard the collapse of north-east builder Stewart Milne will not impact the authority's new housing strategy.

Empty council houses are costing Angus Council thousands in lost rent every week. Image: Kim Cessford/DC Thomson
Empty council houses are costing Angus Council thousands in lost rent every week. Image: Kim Cessford/DC Thomson

Angus Council tenants will face their biggest rent rise in more than a decade after councillors approved a 6.7% hike for 2024/25.

The increase was described as “absolutely necessary” as a special communities committee rubber-stamped the proposal on Tuesday.

It will take the average weekly rent above £80 for the first time.

But Angus rents remains among the lowest in the country.

The average increase will be £4.84 per week more than the 2023/24 figure of £75.91.

Back in 2012, a 7.2% increase was approved but the figure has remained lower since then.

Last year’s increase was 4.1%.

In 2022 it was kept at just 1% to help tenants combat the cost of living crisis.

The rise was the lowest of four options – from 6.7% to 8.2% – put out to consultation this year.

Just 3% of the council’s tenants responded to the rent survey, but 80% of those backed the agreed hike.

Unanimous committee support

Montrose SNP councillor Kenny Braes said the increase was a sensible one.

“6.7% is affordable to our tenants and we believe it’s absolutely necessary,” he said.

“We have had several years of rampant inflation. But we have held previous years’ increases below the rate of inflation.

“We really have to catch up now.

“Crucially it means our prudential borrowing is affordable and that’s an absolute requirement.”

Carnoustie Independent David Cheape said: “Going forward we have to have realistic rents.
“It’s absolutely essential for our future development.”

The rent-setting meeting also received an assurance the authority’s new housing plan will not be hit by the collapse of north-east housebuilder Stewart Milne.

The Stewart Milne Arbroath development Monarchs Rise.

The Aberdeen-based developer plunged into administration last month.

Its sites include Monarch’s Rise in Arbroath.

The council has been buying ‘off-the-shelf’ properties to add to its stock of more than 7,500 homes.

But councillors were told Stewart Milne acquisitions were not part of the area’s strategic housing investment plan.